2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160959
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Genetic Education on Smoking Cessation
Abstract:
Effects of Genetic Education on Smoking Cessation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Houfek, Julia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6542
Co-Authors:J.F. Houfek, J.R. Atwood, D. Dodendorf, C.R. Barron, M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; G.M. Reiser, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; J.R. Atwood, College of Public Healt
An important area of cessation research involves development of individualized pharmacological treatment based on a smoker's genotype. Smokers' knowledge about genotyping for cessation will be a key factor affecting future treatment decisions. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine the effects of education about genetics and smoking on smoking-related schemas and behaviors. The study was guided by social-cognitive theory. An experimental, repeated measures (baseline and 2 weeks and 2 months post-intervention) design was used. The convenience sample (N=33) had a mean age of 38 (SD=12) and smoked an average of 16 cigarettes/day (SD=7.49). The Experimental group (n=16) received a 90 minute genetic educational session. Both Experimental and Control (n=17) groups received brief smoking cessation counseling (SCC). Results indicated that the Experimental group had greater knowledge of genetics at 2 weeks [F (1, 22) = 7.74, p = .01] and at 2 months [F (1, 20) = 17.18, p = .001)]. There were no significant differences between the groups in Smoker and Abstainer Self-Concept scores. However, substantial effect sizes were found for the comparison of Smoker Self-Concept at baseline and at 2 weeks (eta² partial = .13) and 2 months (eta² partial = .15) and for the Abstainer Self-Concept at baseline and 2 months (eta² partial = .13). Experimental subjects trended higher on Abstainer and lower on Smoker Self-Concept than Control subjects. Experimental subjects scored lower on use of cessation strategies at 2 months. Results suggest that Experimental subjects understood and retained the genetic information. The Experimental group's higher Abstainer and lower Smoker Self-Concept effect sizes suggest change toward a nonsmoker self-schema. Abstinence was not affected by the genetic education or SCC, but the Experimental group's lower use of cessation strategies suggests a potential barrier to cessation. Research needs to focus on use of genetic education to assure optimal benefit for cessation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Genetic Education on Smoking Cessationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160959-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Genetic Education on Smoking Cessation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houfek, Julia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6542</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhoufek@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.F. Houfek, J.R. Atwood, D. Dodendorf, C.R. Barron, M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; G.M. Reiser, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; J.R. Atwood, College of Public Healt</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An important area of cessation research involves development of individualized pharmacological treatment based on a smoker's genotype. Smokers' knowledge about genotyping for cessation will be a key factor affecting future treatment decisions. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine the effects of education about genetics and smoking on smoking-related schemas and behaviors. The study was guided by social-cognitive theory. An experimental, repeated measures (baseline and 2 weeks and 2 months post-intervention) design was used. The convenience sample (N=33) had a mean age of 38 (SD=12) and smoked an average of 16 cigarettes/day (SD=7.49). The Experimental group (n=16) received a 90 minute genetic educational session. Both Experimental and Control (n=17) groups received brief smoking cessation counseling (SCC). Results indicated that the Experimental group had greater knowledge of genetics at 2 weeks [F (1, 22) = 7.74, p = .01] and at 2 months [F (1, 20) = 17.18, p = .001)]. There were no significant differences between the groups in Smoker and Abstainer Self-Concept scores. However, substantial effect sizes were found for the comparison of Smoker Self-Concept at baseline and at 2 weeks (eta&sup2; partial = .13) and 2 months (eta&sup2; partial = .15) and for the Abstainer Self-Concept at baseline and 2 months (eta&sup2; partial = .13). Experimental subjects trended higher on Abstainer and lower on Smoker Self-Concept than Control subjects. Experimental subjects scored lower on use of cessation strategies at 2 months. Results suggest that Experimental subjects understood and retained the genetic information. The Experimental group's higher Abstainer and lower Smoker Self-Concept effect sizes suggest change toward a nonsmoker self-schema. Abstinence was not affected by the genetic education or SCC, but the Experimental group's lower use of cessation strategies suggests a potential barrier to cessation. Research needs to focus on use of genetic education to assure optimal benefit for cessation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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