Developmental Precursors of Psychological Distress and Hazardous Drinking Among Lesbians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developmental Precursors of Psychological Distress and Hazardous Drinking Among Lesbians
Abstract:
Developmental Precursors of Psychological Distress and Hazardous Drinking Among Lesbians
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hughes, Tonda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois-Chicago
Title:Health Systems Science
Contact Address:845 South Damen Avenue, Rm 906, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-5106
Co-Authors:T.L. Hughes, T.P. Johnson, Y. Cho, , University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Szalacha, , Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; S.C. Wilsnack, , North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND;
Research conducted with women in the general population has found that early risk factors, in particular early onset of drinking, early sexual intercourse, and parental alcohol problems, are associated with hazardous drinking in adulthood. Much less is known about the relationships between early risk factors and hazardous drinking in sexual minority women (i.e., lesbian and bisexual women). We used data from a community-based sample of 384 sexual minority women interviewed in 2000 and 2004 to examine two research questions: (1) What are the effects of early life experiences (parental drinking problems, age of first consensual heterosexual sexual intercourse, age of drinking onset and age of first sexual orientation disclosure) on hazardous drinking and psychological distress?; and (2) What are the prospective effects of psychological distress and hazardous drinking on one another? Methods and Results: Covariance structure modeling revealed a transactional process suggesting that psychological distress is both a cause and a consequence of hazardous drinking in this population. In addition, disclosing sexual orientation at a younger age is postivitely associated with risk of adult hazardous drinking. The effect of early disclosure is independent of parental drinking, age of drinking onset and age of first consensual heterosexual intercourse. Conclusions and Implications. Study findings?especially those related to age of sexual debut and first drinking?are consistent with research on predominantly heterosexual women in the general population. Early age of sexual orientation disclosure appears to be an important risk factor for hazardous drinking. Mainstream prevention and early intervention programs aimed at reducing risk of hazardous drinking should assess sexual orientation. Greater knowledge about how sexual identity development is associated with other early risk factors will assist in the development of prevention and intervention strategies that more effectively target groups of girls and women at greatest risk for hazardous drinking. Supported by NIAAA AA13328 and AA00266 (Hughes) & AA004610 (Wilsnack).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopmental Precursors of Psychological Distress and Hazardous Drinking Among Lesbiansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developmental Precursors of Psychological Distress and Hazardous Drinking Among Lesbians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hughes, Tonda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois-Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Health Systems Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 South Damen Avenue, Rm 906, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-5106</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thughes@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.L. Hughes, T.P. Johnson, Y. Cho, , University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL; L. Szalacha, , Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ; S.C. Wilsnack, , North Dakota School of Medicine &amp; Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research conducted with women in the general population has found that early risk factors, in particular early onset of drinking, early sexual intercourse, and parental alcohol problems, are associated with hazardous drinking in adulthood. Much less is known about the relationships between early risk factors and hazardous drinking in sexual minority women (i.e., lesbian and bisexual women). We used data from a community-based sample of 384 sexual minority women interviewed in 2000 and 2004 to examine two research questions: (1) What are the effects of early life experiences (parental drinking problems, age of first consensual heterosexual sexual intercourse, age of drinking onset and age of first sexual orientation disclosure) on hazardous drinking and psychological distress?; and (2) What are the prospective effects of psychological distress and hazardous drinking on one another? Methods and Results: Covariance structure modeling revealed a transactional process suggesting that psychological distress is both a cause and a consequence of hazardous drinking in this population. In addition, disclosing sexual orientation at a younger age is postivitely associated with risk of adult hazardous drinking. The effect of early disclosure is independent of parental drinking, age of drinking onset and age of first consensual heterosexual intercourse. Conclusions and Implications. Study findings?especially those related to age of sexual debut and first drinking?are consistent with research on predominantly heterosexual women in the general population. Early age of sexual orientation disclosure appears to be an important risk factor for hazardous drinking. Mainstream prevention and early intervention programs aimed at reducing risk of hazardous drinking should assess sexual orientation. Greater knowledge about how sexual identity development is associated with other early risk factors will assist in the development of prevention and intervention strategies that more effectively target groups of girls and women at greatest risk for hazardous drinking. Supported by NIAAA AA13328 and AA00266 (Hughes) &amp; AA004610 (Wilsnack).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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