Changes in Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Levels in Response to an Acute Stressor in Healthy Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160961
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changes in Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Levels in Response to an Acute Stressor in Healthy Young Adults
Abstract:
Changes in Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Levels in Response to an Acute Stressor in Healthy Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hulme, Polly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, NE, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6563
Co-Authors:P.A. Hulme, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; J.A. French, Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE; S. Agrawal, , Gallup University, Omaha, NE;
The immediate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to acute psychosocial stressors is well known, but the effect of such stressors on diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion has been little studied in healthy populations. We used a major medical school examination as an acute psychosocial stressor and measured diurnal cortisol secretion in 15 young, healthy medical students. Students sampled their saliva 8 times a day (0800h to 2200h) during a 3 day baseline phase and exactly 2 weeks later during a 3 day acute stress phase, with the exam occurring on the last day. Study aims were to determine differences between the baseline and the acute stress phases in (1) area under the curve (AUC) cortisol and (2) characteristics of the diurnal cortisol decline. An enzyme-linked immunoassay specific for saliva was used to assay the 645 saliva specimens collected (90% return rate). Mean values for AUC cortisol did not differ by phase. However, repeated measures linear mixed model analysis demonstrated a phase x time interaction (F = 2.36, p = .028). The morning decline in cortisol secretion during the acute stress phase was more prolonged compared to the baseline phase. In addition, higher 2200h cortisol levels (t = 2.408, p = .033) were evident during the acute phase. The results indicate that against a background of higher evening levels of cortisol, the HPA axis secreted less cortisol over the course of the day during the acute stress phase. Yet, these homeostatic adjustments did not result in increased diurnal cortisol secretion overall, as indicated by the AUC cortisol results. Knowledge of healthy physiological responses to acute psychosocial stressors is important for nurses who counsel their patients on stress reduction and management. Further research is needed to contrast these findings with diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion in response to chronic psychosocial stressors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanges in Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Levels in Response to an Acute Stressor in Healthy Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160961-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Changes in Diurnal Salivary Cortisol Levels in Response to an Acute Stressor in Healthy Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hulme, Polly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, NE, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6563</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phulme@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.A. Hulme, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; J.A. French, Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE; S. Agrawal, , Gallup University, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The immediate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to acute psychosocial stressors is well known, but the effect of such stressors on diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion has been little studied in healthy populations. We used a major medical school examination as an acute psychosocial stressor and measured diurnal cortisol secretion in 15 young, healthy medical students. Students sampled their saliva 8 times a day (0800h to 2200h) during a 3 day baseline phase and exactly 2 weeks later during a 3 day acute stress phase, with the exam occurring on the last day. Study aims were to determine differences between the baseline and the acute stress phases in (1) area under the curve (AUC) cortisol and (2) characteristics of the diurnal cortisol decline. An enzyme-linked immunoassay specific for saliva was used to assay the 645 saliva specimens collected (90% return rate). Mean values for AUC cortisol did not differ by phase. However, repeated measures linear mixed model analysis demonstrated a phase x time interaction (F = 2.36, p = .028). The morning decline in cortisol secretion during the acute stress phase was more prolonged compared to the baseline phase. In addition, higher 2200h cortisol levels (t = 2.408, p = .033) were evident during the acute phase. The results indicate that against a background of higher evening levels of cortisol, the HPA axis secreted less cortisol over the course of the day during the acute stress phase. Yet, these homeostatic adjustments did not result in increased diurnal cortisol secretion overall, as indicated by the AUC cortisol results. Knowledge of healthy physiological responses to acute psychosocial stressors is important for nurses who counsel their patients on stress reduction and management. Further research is needed to contrast these findings with diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion in response to chronic psychosocial stressors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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