2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160962
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of a home diary to assess children's pain after a tonsillectomy
Abstract:
Use of a home diary to assess children's pain after a tonsillectomy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Huth, Myra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center
Contact Address:3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 11016, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA
Contact Telephone:513-636-9969
Co-Authors:M.M. Huth, N.M. Daraiseh, C.A. Prows, L. Lin, Center for Professional Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH; A.P. Jeffries, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;
Purpose: Diaries are a means of collecting pain data in the home. After most tonsillectomies children report moderate to severe pain. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a home diary over four days to assess pain, medication use, side effects, food intake and sleep; to assess return and completion rates; and recruitment and retention of children after day surgery. Framework: The Huth & Moore (1998) theory of acute pain management in infants and children provides a framework for the assessment, management, and re-assessment of pediatric pain. Subjects: The study recruited parents of 40 children, aged 5 to 17 years, scheduled for a tonsillectomy with or without an adenoidectomy. Methods: A descriptive study using an investigator-developed home diary and follow up interview were used to assess diary feasibility, usability, and satisfaction. Results: Twenty-eight (74%) diaries were returned. Significant differences were found between mean pre-medication (62.1, SD 24.0) and post-medication pain scores (39.2, SD 26.6) on a 0-100 self-report pain scale. On average children received 2.3 daily doses of Tylenol with codeine and parents reported little to no sedation following medication administration. Parents (70.3%) reported their children ate "less than normal." On a scale of 0 (very easy) to 10 (very difficult) the average difficulty rating by parents to complete the diary was 1.1 and to understand the dairy was 1.0. Recruitment difficulties centered on number comprehension, number of study sites, canceled surgeries, and competing studies. Conclusions: A home diary was feasible for parents to use at home over four days. Parents indicated that the diary was not burdensome to complete. The protocol indicated that we were able to recruit and retain participants. Home diaries are a useful method for collecting data about pain management that can assist nurses in promoting adherence to the pain protocol.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of a home diary to assess children's pain after a tonsillectomyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160962-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of a home diary to assess children's pain after a tonsillectomy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huth, Myra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 11016, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-636-9969</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">myra.huth@cchmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.M. Huth, N.M. Daraiseh, C.A. Prows, L. Lin, Center for Professional Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH; A.P. Jeffries, College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Diaries are a means of collecting pain data in the home. After most tonsillectomies children report moderate to severe pain. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a home diary over four days to assess pain, medication use, side effects, food intake and sleep; to assess return and completion rates; and recruitment and retention of children after day surgery. Framework: The Huth &amp; Moore (1998) theory of acute pain management in infants and children provides a framework for the assessment, management, and re-assessment of pediatric pain. Subjects: The study recruited parents of 40 children, aged 5 to 17 years, scheduled for a tonsillectomy with or without an adenoidectomy. Methods: A descriptive study using an investigator-developed home diary and follow up interview were used to assess diary feasibility, usability, and satisfaction. Results: Twenty-eight (74%) diaries were returned. Significant differences were found between mean pre-medication (62.1, SD 24.0) and post-medication pain scores (39.2, SD 26.6) on a 0-100 self-report pain scale. On average children received 2.3 daily doses of Tylenol with codeine and parents reported little to no sedation following medication administration. Parents (70.3%) reported their children ate &quot;less than normal.&quot; On a scale of 0 (very easy) to 10 (very difficult) the average difficulty rating by parents to complete the diary was 1.1 and to understand the dairy was 1.0. Recruitment difficulties centered on number comprehension, number of study sites, canceled surgeries, and competing studies. Conclusions: A home diary was feasible for parents to use at home over four days. Parents indicated that the diary was not burdensome to complete. The protocol indicated that we were able to recruit and retain participants. Home diaries are a useful method for collecting data about pain management that can assist nurses in promoting adherence to the pain protocol.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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