The Association of Tobacco Marketing with Socioeconomic and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Neighborhoods

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160965
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Association of Tobacco Marketing with Socioeconomic and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Neighborhoods
Abstract:
The Association of Tobacco Marketing with Socioeconomic and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Neighborhoods
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jones, Pamela, PhD, RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6564
Co-Authors:P.R. Jones, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; G.K. Singh, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, HRSA, Rockville, MD; J. Martin, Tobacco Free Nebraska, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services , Lincoln, NE; P.R. J
Background: Although tobacco use causes an estimated 438,000 premature deaths each year, tobacco products remain one of the most heavily marketed products in the US. In 2005, major tobacco companies in the United States spent over $35 million a day to promote and advertise their products. The 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA), which banned billboard tobacco advertising and restricted events sponsorship, the tobacco industry has increasingly focused its marketing activities on the point-of-sale environment. While prior to the MSA, there was ample evidence to suggest that billboard tobacco advertising was more prevalent in communities with a lower average income or a higher proportion of minorities, similar evidence is scant in the post-MSA period. The aim of this study is to examine the association of point-of-sale tobacco marketing with median income and racial/ethnic composition at the neighborhood level in Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. Methods: Fieldworkers collected comprehensive tobacco marketing data from all of the stores that were licensed to sell tobacco in 84 randomly selected neighborhoods in the Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. Simple linear regression analyses were employed to examine how household income, percent African Americans, and percent Hispanics were related to tobacco marketing per square mile. Results: An increase of $10,000 in median household income was associated with a decrease of 17.9% in the number of tobacco marking items per square mile in a neighborhood (p = 0.006). There was very little evidence that percent African American and percent Hispanic population in the neighborhoods were related to tobacco marketing. Conclusion: In the post-MSA era, the tobacco industry is continuing to disproportionally target economically disadvantaged individuals, who already suffer from higher smoking prevalence. A comprehensive ban on tobacco marketing, as recommended by the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, is likely to reduce tobacco use disparities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Association of Tobacco Marketing with Socioeconomic and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Neighborhoodsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160965-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Association of Tobacco Marketing with Socioeconomic and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Neighborhoods</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Pamela, PhD, RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6564</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prjones@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.R. Jones, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; G.K. Singh, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, HRSA, Rockville, MD; J. Martin, Tobacco Free Nebraska, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services , Lincoln, NE; P.R. J</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Although tobacco use causes an estimated 438,000 premature deaths each year, tobacco products remain one of the most heavily marketed products in the US. In 2005, major tobacco companies in the United States spent over $35 million a day to promote and advertise their products. The 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA), which banned billboard tobacco advertising and restricted events sponsorship, the tobacco industry has increasingly focused its marketing activities on the point-of-sale environment. While prior to the MSA, there was ample evidence to suggest that billboard tobacco advertising was more prevalent in communities with a lower average income or a higher proportion of minorities, similar evidence is scant in the post-MSA period. The aim of this study is to examine the association of point-of-sale tobacco marketing with median income and racial/ethnic composition at the neighborhood level in Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. Methods: Fieldworkers collected comprehensive tobacco marketing data from all of the stores that were licensed to sell tobacco in 84 randomly selected neighborhoods in the Omaha Metropolitan Area, Nebraska. Simple linear regression analyses were employed to examine how household income, percent African Americans, and percent Hispanics were related to tobacco marketing per square mile. Results: An increase of $10,000 in median household income was associated with a decrease of 17.9% in the number of tobacco marking items per square mile in a neighborhood (p = 0.006). There was very little evidence that percent African American and percent Hispanic population in the neighborhoods were related to tobacco marketing. Conclusion: In the post-MSA era, the tobacco industry is continuing to disproportionally target economically disadvantaged individuals, who already suffer from higher smoking prevalence. A comprehensive ban on tobacco marketing, as recommended by the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, is likely to reduce tobacco use disparities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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