Transition to Motherhood in Low Income Women 19-29 Years Who Are Becoming Mothers For the First Time and Who Have Had a Previous Live Birth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160966
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition to Motherhood in Low Income Women 19-29 Years Who Are Becoming Mothers For the First Time and Who Have Had a Previous Live Birth
Abstract:
Transition to Motherhood in Low Income Women 19-29 Years Who Are Becoming Mothers For the First Time and Who Have Had a Previous Live Birth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kaiser, Margaret, PhD, APHN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6539
Co-Authors:M. Kaiser, K. Kaiser, T. Barry, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Nurses have an extraordinary opportunity to help low income women 19-29 years who are becoming mothers for the first time or who have had a previous live birth. The becoming a mother transition is relevant to nursing's unique intervention primarily by helping them to gain confidence and competence in mothering skills, including how to manage their health and the health of their children. Health management skills include management of health status (including self perceived health status and wellness) and adherence to therapeutic regimens. Research aimed at better understanding of maternal health management skills for themselves and their children holds potential for improvement in child health outcomes and mitigation of health disparities in birth outcomes in low income pregnant women. The conceptual framework for this study is the Health Effects of Life Transitions Model (Kaiser, Kaiser & Barry, 2009) A comparative retrospective, correlational design was used to determine (a) differences in health management skill between low income 19-29 year old first time pregnant mothers and pregnant mothers who have had a previous live birth, and (b) relationships among selected transition assets/risks and health behavior indicators of transition with the transition adaptive outcome of health management. A secondary analysis approach was applied to accomplish the specific aims. The sample included 1,888 pregnant women 19-29 years (n=1,223 had a previous live birth) from a state Medicaid managed care program who completed an enrollment health assessment between January 2001 and December 2006. Health management skill was measured by the indicator of the woman's selection of a provider for her baby post delivery. Eighty three percent (n=1578) of the women selected a doctor for their baby prenatally. Of these, 490 were having their first birth and 1088 had a previous live birth. For those with no previous live births race was the only significant association with health management skill. For those with previous live births, trimester when health assessment was completed and community agency use were significantly associated with health management skill. Implications for nursing practice and nursing research related to transition to motherhood are addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition to Motherhood in Low Income Women 19-29 Years Who Are Becoming Mothers For the First Time and Who Have Had a Previous Live Birthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160966-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transition to Motherhood in Low Income Women 19-29 Years Who Are Becoming Mothers For the First Time and Who Have Had a Previous Live Birth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaiser, Margaret, PhD, APHN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6539</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkaiser@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Kaiser, K. Kaiser, T. Barry, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses have an extraordinary opportunity to help low income women 19-29 years who are becoming mothers for the first time or who have had a previous live birth. The becoming a mother transition is relevant to nursing's unique intervention primarily by helping them to gain confidence and competence in mothering skills, including how to manage their health and the health of their children. Health management skills include management of health status (including self perceived health status and wellness) and adherence to therapeutic regimens. Research aimed at better understanding of maternal health management skills for themselves and their children holds potential for improvement in child health outcomes and mitigation of health disparities in birth outcomes in low income pregnant women. The conceptual framework for this study is the Health Effects of Life Transitions Model (Kaiser, Kaiser &amp; Barry, 2009) A comparative retrospective, correlational design was used to determine (a) differences in health management skill between low income 19-29 year old first time pregnant mothers and pregnant mothers who have had a previous live birth, and (b) relationships among selected transition assets/risks and health behavior indicators of transition with the transition adaptive outcome of health management. A secondary analysis approach was applied to accomplish the specific aims. The sample included 1,888 pregnant women 19-29 years (n=1,223 had a previous live birth) from a state Medicaid managed care program who completed an enrollment health assessment between January 2001 and December 2006. Health management skill was measured by the indicator of the woman's selection of a provider for her baby post delivery. Eighty three percent (n=1578) of the women selected a doctor for their baby prenatally. Of these, 490 were having their first birth and 1088 had a previous live birth. For those with no previous live births race was the only significant association with health management skill. For those with previous live births, trimester when health assessment was completed and community agency use were significantly associated with health management skill. Implications for nursing practice and nursing research related to transition to motherhood are addressed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.