2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160968
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) for Quality Measures
Abstract:
Health Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) for Quality Measures
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kramer-Jackman, Kelli, PhD., ARNP, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Kansas University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-945-6814
Co-Authors:K.L. Kramer-Jackman, S.A. Popkess-Vawter, School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City , KS;
Problem: Current healthcare literature is devoid of developmental guidelines and evaluation methods for quality health information technology-delivered measures used in healthcare practice and research. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply the Health Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) as a process for developing and evaluating HIT-delivered measures for healthcare practice and research. Framework: The HIT Model was derived from three nationally-reputable resources describing health literacy and website development. Subjects: HITM steps involved literacy, content, and technology experts and adult patient volunteers in weight management telehealth programs. Methods: HITM consists of five steps to establish: (a) readability, (b) content validity, (c) HIT format, (d) expert usability evaluation, and (e) user usability testing. Each step includes both developmental and evaluation phases with associated methods and tools. The researcher will review how the HITM guided development and evaluation of three Tension Scales used for assessment of rural telehealth patients. Results of the five steps included: (a) readability level at a 5th grade; (b) content validity established with both S-CVI/Ave of .96 and kappa score of 0.97; (c) HIT formatting with functional programming codes, links, routing, and password-protection; (d) expert usability confirmation using Usability Guideline criteria; and (e) user usability performance testing with high Usability Scale scores and high participant opinion scores. Conclusions: The HITM is a promising method to begin developing and evaluating HIT-delivered measures for nursing practice and research. Future research is needed to explore benefits of HIT development models?specifically, psychometric comparisons of HIT measures designed with and without guidance from guidelines and standards. Nurses, academicians, researchers, and other healthcare professionals can unite across care settings to develop, test, and maintain quality HIT measures to promote cost-effective and well-coordinated healthcare.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) for Quality Measuresen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160968-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) for Quality Measures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kramer-Jackman, Kelli, PhD., ARNP, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kansas University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mail stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-945-6814</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kkramer-jackman@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.L. Kramer-Jackman, S.A. Popkess-Vawter, School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City , KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Current healthcare literature is devoid of developmental guidelines and evaluation methods for quality health information technology-delivered measures used in healthcare practice and research. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply the Health Information Technology-delivery Method (HITM) as a process for developing and evaluating HIT-delivered measures for healthcare practice and research. Framework: The HIT Model was derived from three nationally-reputable resources describing health literacy and website development. Subjects: HITM steps involved literacy, content, and technology experts and adult patient volunteers in weight management telehealth programs. Methods: HITM consists of five steps to establish: (a) readability, (b) content validity, (c) HIT format, (d) expert usability evaluation, and (e) user usability testing. Each step includes both developmental and evaluation phases with associated methods and tools. The researcher will review how the HITM guided development and evaluation of three Tension Scales used for assessment of rural telehealth patients. Results of the five steps included: (a) readability level at a 5th grade; (b) content validity established with both S-CVI/Ave of .96 and kappa score of 0.97; (c) HIT formatting with functional programming codes, links, routing, and password-protection; (d) expert usability confirmation using Usability Guideline criteria; and (e) user usability performance testing with high Usability Scale scores and high participant opinion scores. Conclusions: The HITM is a promising method to begin developing and evaluating HIT-delivered measures for nursing practice and research. Future research is needed to explore benefits of HIT development models?specifically, psychometric comparisons of HIT measures designed with and without guidance from guidelines and standards. Nurses, academicians, researchers, and other healthcare professionals can unite across care settings to develop, test, and maintain quality HIT measures to promote cost-effective and well-coordinated healthcare.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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