2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160970
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Coping in Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers
Abstract:
Stress and Coping in Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402-559-6535
Co-Authors:L.M. LaFramboise, B.C. Yates, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Objective: Of the more than 50 million Americans who are caregivers, 10% care for heart failure (HF) patients. People with little or no health care training are thrust into the role of "first responders," a stressful, burdensome role. The purpose of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the effects of a stress management intervention on caregiving demands and ways of coping in HF spousal caregivers. Methods: Randomly assigned caregivers received usual care or the intervention, based on Lazarus & Folkman's stress and coping theory, which was delivered daily for two months via the Health Buddy (telehealth communication device). The 19 spouses were caregivers of Class III or IV HF patients. Data were collected at baseline, 1 month, and 2 months (post-intervention). Measures included the Caregiver Burden Scale and the Ways of Coping Checklist. While the sample was too small to determine statistical significance, effect sizes (eta-squared [eta²]) were examined, using analysis of covariance, for caregiving demand and coping. Effect size was interpreted as: .01 = small; .06 = medium; and .14 = large, equivalent to Cohen's f of .10, .25, and .40, respectively. Results: Effect sizes were medium-large for caregiving demands (eta²=.09) and for the coping subscales of seeks social support (eta²=.10) and wishful thinking (eta²=.136). In comparing groups, the intervention group reported lower caregiving demands and used more "social support seeking" strategies and fewer "wishful thinking" strategies. Similarly, the intervention group reported lower caregiving difficulty (eta²=.024) and lower use of avoidance coping strategies (eta²=.03); however, the effect sizes were smaller. Conclusions: The intervention showed promise in reducing caregiving demands and difficulty, and improving use of coping strategies, indicating intervention effectiveness, but more study is needed in a larger sample.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Coping in Heart Failure Spousal Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160970-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Coping in Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-559-6535</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llaframb@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.M. LaFramboise, B.C. Yates, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Of the more than 50 million Americans who are caregivers, 10% care for heart failure (HF) patients. People with little or no health care training are thrust into the role of &quot;first responders,&quot; a stressful, burdensome role. The purpose of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the effects of a stress management intervention on caregiving demands and ways of coping in HF spousal caregivers. Methods: Randomly assigned caregivers received usual care or the intervention, based on Lazarus &amp; Folkman's stress and coping theory, which was delivered daily for two months via the Health Buddy (telehealth communication device). The 19 spouses were caregivers of Class III or IV HF patients. Data were collected at baseline, 1 month, and 2 months (post-intervention). Measures included the Caregiver Burden Scale and the Ways of Coping Checklist. While the sample was too small to determine statistical significance, effect sizes (eta-squared [eta&sup2;]) were examined, using analysis of covariance, for caregiving demand and coping. Effect size was interpreted as: .01 = small; .06 = medium; and .14 = large, equivalent to Cohen's f of .10, .25, and .40, respectively. Results: Effect sizes were medium-large for caregiving demands (eta&sup2;=.09) and for the coping subscales of seeks social support (eta&sup2;=.10) and wishful thinking (eta&sup2;=.136). In comparing groups, the intervention group reported lower caregiving demands and used more &quot;social support seeking&quot; strategies and fewer &quot;wishful thinking&quot; strategies. Similarly, the intervention group reported lower caregiving difficulty (eta&sup2;=.024) and lower use of avoidance coping strategies (eta&sup2;=.03); however, the effect sizes were smaller. Conclusions: The intervention showed promise in reducing caregiving demands and difficulty, and improving use of coping strategies, indicating intervention effectiveness, but more study is needed in a larger sample.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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