2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults' Views of Falling: A Qualitative Metasummary
Abstract:
Older Adults' Views of Falling: A Qualitative Metasummary
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lyons, Stacie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research
Contact Address:1230 West 60th St, Davenport, IA, 52806, USA
Contact Telephone:563 9405234
Co-Authors:S. Lyons, , Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Davenport, IA;
Falls are the major cause of injury-related death and disability for persons age 65 years or older. Most fall prevention interventions are designed around the concept of risk. However, older adults' uptake and adherence to professional recommendations about modifying fall risk is modest. Given their reluctance to engage in risk reducing behaviors, older adults "at risk" for falling may be contesting the salience of this concept as a framework for elder-centric fall prevention strategies. Problematically, most fall risk factor profiles were developed without advice from older adults, while few interventions take into account the myriad meanings of falls from the perspectives of the people who have experienced one. In this study, a systematic review of qualitative studies of older adults with a history of falling was conducted using metasummary data analytic techniques described by Sandelowski & Barrosa (2003). Research published from 1990-2009 in English and in which findings focused on elders' perceptions of falling was included. Studies conducted only with family caregivers or health professionals were excluded from analysis. The bibliographic sample included 20 research reports from such disciplines as nursing, aging studies, geriatrics, occupational and physical therapy, psychology, and public health. The majority of studies were conducted with samples of older white females in the UK, USA, Australia, and Canada, although a few studies were conducted with more gender and ethnically equitable samples (UK, Tawain, China). Sample characteristics, extracted findings, frequency patterns, and estimated effect sizes are highighted. Themes include taking care, inevitability of falls, using common sense, other people's problems, exercising control, becoming fit, balancing in/dependence, measuring risks, and making connections. This qualitative metasummary revealed that older adults' views of falling call into question the conventional wisdom of current fall prevention programs. Nursing interventions should be centered around elders' perceptions and conceptions of falling in later life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults' Views of Falling: A Qualitative Metasummaryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160975-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults' Views of Falling: A Qualitative Metasummary</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lyons, Stacie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1230 West 60th St, Davenport, IA, 52806, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">563 9405234</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stacie_lyons@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Lyons, , Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Davenport, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Falls are the major cause of injury-related death and disability for persons age 65 years or older. Most fall prevention interventions are designed around the concept of risk. However, older adults' uptake and adherence to professional recommendations about modifying fall risk is modest. Given their reluctance to engage in risk reducing behaviors, older adults &quot;at risk&quot; for falling may be contesting the salience of this concept as a framework for elder-centric fall prevention strategies. Problematically, most fall risk factor profiles were developed without advice from older adults, while few interventions take into account the myriad meanings of falls from the perspectives of the people who have experienced one. In this study, a systematic review of qualitative studies of older adults with a history of falling was conducted using metasummary data analytic techniques described by Sandelowski &amp; Barrosa (2003). Research published from 1990-2009 in English and in which findings focused on elders' perceptions of falling was included. Studies conducted only with family caregivers or health professionals were excluded from analysis. The bibliographic sample included 20 research reports from such disciplines as nursing, aging studies, geriatrics, occupational and physical therapy, psychology, and public health. The majority of studies were conducted with samples of older white females in the UK, USA, Australia, and Canada, although a few studies were conducted with more gender and ethnically equitable samples (UK, Tawain, China). Sample characteristics, extracted findings, frequency patterns, and estimated effect sizes are highighted. Themes include taking care, inevitability of falls, using common sense, other people's problems, exercising control, becoming fit, balancing in/dependence, measuring risks, and making connections. This qualitative metasummary revealed that older adults' views of falling call into question the conventional wisdom of current fall prevention programs. Nursing interventions should be centered around elders' perceptions and conceptions of falling in later life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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