2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160976
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Feasibility Test of Women First!: Preventing HIV in Women Leaving County Jails
Abstract:
A Feasibility Test of Women First!: Preventing HIV in Women Leaving County Jails
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mallory, Caroline
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:204 Edwards Hall, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309-438-2659
Co-Authors:C. Mallory, , Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
Women in county jails are at high risk for HIV primarily by having unprotected intercourse after their release. Yet there is little published research on the feasibility or efficacy of prevention programs for women in county jails. In this pre-experimental study we tested the feasibility of delivering an HIV prevention intervention in a small and large jail and conducted preliminary efficacy testing. Women First! is an intervention emphasizing sexual assertiveness, condom practice and discussion of barriers to safer sex and harm reduction approaches to safer sex. Women over 18 in a county jail in central Illinois and within three months of release were recruited following protocols to protect prisoner rights. Volunteers completed pre-intervention measures, participated in the intervention and completed post-intervention measures within 8-12 hours. Outcome measures were the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale, the Measure of Observed Condom Use Skills, vulnerability to HIV, and intentions to use condoms. The sample consisted of 35 women between 18 and 35. Less than half (40%) had completed high school, and most (88%) had an income of $1600.00 per month or less. The majority of women were either African American (37%) or Caucasian (37%). Women believed they were at low risk for HIV and unlikely to become infected. Excepting perceived vulnerability to HIV infection, analyses showed means moving in expected directions on correct application of condoms, condom self-efficacy, and likelihood of using condoms. Dependent t-tests reveal significant differences between means on correct application of condoms (t = -14.39, df = 31, p = 0.000) and condom self-efficacy (t = -4.372, df = 31, p = 0.000) suggesting that the intervention is having the desired effect. No significant differences were found on the vulnerability to HIV or intentions of using condoms with future partners. Despite limitations of a within subjects design and the small sample size, cautious optimism at the potential for Women First! to improve correct and consistent condom use among women exiting county jails is warranted. However, follow-up data collection after discharge is essential to determine if the intervention will have an impact on women's protective practices in challenging sexual contexts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Feasibility Test of Women First!: Preventing HIV in Women Leaving County Jailsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160976-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Feasibility Test of Women First!: Preventing HIV in Women Leaving County Jails</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mallory, Caroline</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">204 Edwards Hall, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-438-2659</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmmallo@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Mallory, , Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women in county jails are at high risk for HIV primarily by having unprotected intercourse after their release. Yet there is little published research on the feasibility or efficacy of prevention programs for women in county jails. In this pre-experimental study we tested the feasibility of delivering an HIV prevention intervention in a small and large jail and conducted preliminary efficacy testing. Women First! is an intervention emphasizing sexual assertiveness, condom practice and discussion of barriers to safer sex and harm reduction approaches to safer sex. Women over 18 in a county jail in central Illinois and within three months of release were recruited following protocols to protect prisoner rights. Volunteers completed pre-intervention measures, participated in the intervention and completed post-intervention measures within 8-12 hours. Outcome measures were the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale, the Measure of Observed Condom Use Skills, vulnerability to HIV, and intentions to use condoms. The sample consisted of 35 women between 18 and 35. Less than half (40%) had completed high school, and most (88%) had an income of $1600.00 per month or less. The majority of women were either African American (37%) or Caucasian (37%). Women believed they were at low risk for HIV and unlikely to become infected. Excepting perceived vulnerability to HIV infection, analyses showed means moving in expected directions on correct application of condoms, condom self-efficacy, and likelihood of using condoms. Dependent t-tests reveal significant differences between means on correct application of condoms (t = -14.39, df = 31, p = 0.000) and condom self-efficacy (t = -4.372, df = 31, p = 0.000) suggesting that the intervention is having the desired effect. No significant differences were found on the vulnerability to HIV or intentions of using condoms with future partners. Despite limitations of a within subjects design and the small sample size, cautious optimism at the potential for Women First! to improve correct and consistent condom use among women exiting county jails is warranted. However, follow-up data collection after discharge is essential to determine if the intervention will have an impact on women's protective practices in challenging sexual contexts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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