2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160977
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Distance Caregiving a Parent with Advanced Cancer
Abstract:
Distance Caregiving a Parent with Advanced Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mazanec, Polly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-4788
Co-Authors:M. Polly, B.J. Daly, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; M. Polly, , Ireland Cancer Center University Hospitals of Cleveland Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH;
Distance caregiving, the experience of providing instrumental and/or emotional support to an ill loved one who lives far away, is on the rise. More than seven million Americans are distance caregivers, and the number is expected to grow as baby boomers and their parents age. Although much is known about caregiving a family member with cancer, little research has been done on the experience of distance caregiving and intervention studies are non-existent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of distance on caregiver reaction (benefit and burden) in distance caregivers of parents with advanced cancer and to explore predictors of caregiver psychological well-being (depression, anxiety, and distress). An adapted version of Pearlin's Stress Process Model guided this study. A mixed-methods approach, with a simultaneous predictive correlational design and a qualitative analysis, was used. The study sample was a convenience sample of 80 local and distance caregivers of patients at a large Midwestern Comprehensive Cancer Center. Although the proposed model of caregiver reaction as a mediator between primary stressors, structural factors and psychological well-being was not supported, important predictors of caregiver burden (distance, and race) and negative psychological well-being (distance, caregiver age, gender, and patient stage of cancer) were identified. Additional exploratory analyses demonstrated that distance caregivers' anxiety (p = .007) and total mood disturbance scores (p = .035) were greater than local caregivers.' Distance caregivers' mean distress score (6.12 on a 0-10 scale, with 10 being the most distressed) exceeded the NCCN Guidelines' cutoff score for clinical intervention. Qualitative interviews of 14 distance caregivers informed the quantitative findings and revealed five themes: Benefit/Burden, Struggling with Uncertainty, Protecting, Direct Action through Information Seeking, and Staying Connected. Future research is needed to build on this preliminary understanding of the distance caregiver experience. Interventions which improve communication with the health care team and offer emotional support to distance family caregivers may improve their psychological well-being.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDistance Caregiving a Parent with Advanced Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160977-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Distance Caregiving a Parent with Advanced Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mazanec, Polly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-4788</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmm@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Polly, B.J. Daly, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; M. Polly, , Ireland Cancer Center University Hospitals of Cleveland Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Distance caregiving, the experience of providing instrumental and/or emotional support to an ill loved one who lives far away, is on the rise. More than seven million Americans are distance caregivers, and the number is expected to grow as baby boomers and their parents age. Although much is known about caregiving a family member with cancer, little research has been done on the experience of distance caregiving and intervention studies are non-existent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of distance on caregiver reaction (benefit and burden) in distance caregivers of parents with advanced cancer and to explore predictors of caregiver psychological well-being (depression, anxiety, and distress). An adapted version of Pearlin's Stress Process Model guided this study. A mixed-methods approach, with a simultaneous predictive correlational design and a qualitative analysis, was used. The study sample was a convenience sample of 80 local and distance caregivers of patients at a large Midwestern Comprehensive Cancer Center. Although the proposed model of caregiver reaction as a mediator between primary stressors, structural factors and psychological well-being was not supported, important predictors of caregiver burden (distance, and race) and negative psychological well-being (distance, caregiver age, gender, and patient stage of cancer) were identified. Additional exploratory analyses demonstrated that distance caregivers' anxiety (p = .007) and total mood disturbance scores (p = .035) were greater than local caregivers.' Distance caregivers' mean distress score (6.12 on a 0-10 scale, with 10 being the most distressed) exceeded the NCCN Guidelines' cutoff score for clinical intervention. Qualitative interviews of 14 distance caregivers informed the quantitative findings and revealed five themes: Benefit/Burden, Struggling with Uncertainty, Protecting, Direct Action through Information Seeking, and Staying Connected. Future research is needed to build on this preliminary understanding of the distance caregiver experience. Interventions which improve communication with the health care team and offer emotional support to distance family caregivers may improve their psychological well-being.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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