Struggling to Understand the Hurdle of Pain While Protecting the Child: The Parental Process of Appraising Child Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160979
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Struggling to Understand the Hurdle of Pain While Protecting the Child: The Parental Process of Appraising Child Pain
Abstract:
Struggling to Understand the Hurdle of Pain While Protecting the Child: The Parental Process of Appraising Child Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Meiers, Sonja, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:6375 Granite Drive NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA
Contact Telephone:507-536-5671
Co-Authors:S.J. Meiers, S. Tucker, Nursing Research Division, Mayo Clinic , Rochester, MN; S.J. Meiers, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Winona State University-Rochester, Rochester, MN; D. Ballweg, K. Cambern, L. Mundy, Department of Nursing, Mayo Clinic, Ro
Problem: Pain is a common experience among children and infants in clinical settings worldwide. Nurses often depend upon parents to aid in assessment of pain. Yet, the unique parent's processes of or accuracy in appraising pain are not fully known. The purpose of this study was to explore the social process of parent appraisal of child and infant pain and to examine cultural influences upon this appraisal. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A symbolic interactionist perspective was used to explore this social process. Methodology and Design: A qualitative design with grounded theory method was used to guide data collection and analysis in the larger international study. Settings were two acute care clinical sites, one in Rome, Italy and one at a large Midwestern tertiary hospital in the USA. This paper reports on findings from the USA sample of 12 parents of children hospitalized in three units (the cardiac surgical intensive care, the neonatal intensive care unit and the general pediatric care area). Data were drawn from semi-structured interviews and bedside observations of parent-child interactions. Analysis: A constant comparative data analysis approach resulted in coding of text and observation data, thematic naming, comparison of differences and commonalities between participants, and re-assembling of the themes to describe the core process and its related elements. Findings and Interpretation: The core process of parent appraisal of pain was identified as "struggling to understand the hurdle of pain while protecting the child" Parents described a process of comparing, observing, grading, and rationalizing in their struggle to understand child pain. Unique cultural values and beliefs influenced the parent's depth of involvement in the appraisal process. Parent sense of success in protecting the child was interwoven with the relationship with the provider. Knowledge gained in this study can enhance development and testing of relevant clinical actions in parent-provider partnership care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStruggling to Understand the Hurdle of Pain While Protecting the Child: The Parental Process of Appraising Child Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160979-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Struggling to Understand the Hurdle of Pain While Protecting the Child: The Parental Process of Appraising Child Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meiers, Sonja, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6375 Granite Drive NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-536-5671</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smeiers@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.J. Meiers, S. Tucker, Nursing Research Division, Mayo Clinic , Rochester, MN; S.J. Meiers, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Winona State University-Rochester, Rochester, MN; D. Ballweg, K. Cambern, L. Mundy, Department of Nursing, Mayo Clinic, Ro</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Pain is a common experience among children and infants in clinical settings worldwide. Nurses often depend upon parents to aid in assessment of pain. Yet, the unique parent's processes of or accuracy in appraising pain are not fully known. The purpose of this study was to explore the social process of parent appraisal of child and infant pain and to examine cultural influences upon this appraisal. Theoretical/conceptual framework: A symbolic interactionist perspective was used to explore this social process. Methodology and Design: A qualitative design with grounded theory method was used to guide data collection and analysis in the larger international study. Settings were two acute care clinical sites, one in Rome, Italy and one at a large Midwestern tertiary hospital in the USA. This paper reports on findings from the USA sample of 12 parents of children hospitalized in three units (the cardiac surgical intensive care, the neonatal intensive care unit and the general pediatric care area). Data were drawn from semi-structured interviews and bedside observations of parent-child interactions. Analysis: A constant comparative data analysis approach resulted in coding of text and observation data, thematic naming, comparison of differences and commonalities between participants, and re-assembling of the themes to describe the core process and its related elements. Findings and Interpretation: The core process of parent appraisal of pain was identified as &quot;struggling to understand the hurdle of pain while protecting the child&quot; Parents described a process of comparing, observing, grading, and rationalizing in their struggle to understand child pain. Unique cultural values and beliefs influenced the parent's depth of involvement in the appraisal process. Parent sense of success in protecting the child was interwoven with the relationship with the provider. Knowledge gained in this study can enhance development and testing of relevant clinical actions in parent-provider partnership care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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