Utilizing Evidence Based Practice During the Second Stage of Labor: Application of Warm Compresses and Positional Changes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160983
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing Evidence Based Practice During the Second Stage of Labor: Application of Warm Compresses and Positional Changes
Abstract:
Utilizing Evidence Based Practice During the Second Stage of Labor: Application of Warm Compresses and Positional Changes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Murphy-Smith, Mary, MS
P.I. Institution Name:St. Xavier Uniiversity
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Contact Telephone:773-298-3723
Co-Authors:M.T. Murphy-Smith, K. Wroble, Z. Boyadjian-Samawi, School of Nursing, St. Xavier University, Chicago , IL; M.T. Murphy-Smith, K. Wroble, Z. Boyadjian-Samawi, Maternal Child, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL;
Purpose: The purpose of this study was two-fold: first, to determine whether the nursing interventions of positional changes and warm compresses to the perineum during the second stage of labor are factors that could prevent perineal trauma. The second was to evaluate nursing compliance with evidenced based practice interventions. Subjects: Study was conducted in a midwestern academic medical center that provides Level III Perinatal Services. All women that participated in the study received warm compresses and positional changes during the active phase of the second stage of labor. Methods: This was a retrospective review of pregnancy and birth data recorded into the electronic documentation system for women (N = 421) with normal vaginal births (92%), vacuum assisted (8%). The study intervention included positional changes (72%). These positional changes were hands/knees, right/left side-lying and semi-fowlers. The second intervention included perineal warm compresses which consisted of warm moist washcloths (28%). Chi-square tests were used for analysis. Results: The sample included 421 women with a mean age of 29 plus or minus 5.7 years. The majority were married (56%) and primigravidas (34%); 23% had received childbirth education. The mean weight of newborns was 3.3 kilograms. Most subjects did not receive an episiotomy (90%) due to institutional practice. Data analysis indicates that there were subjects with intact perineums (33%), first degree lacerations (26%) and second degree lacerations (33%). Subjects that received both interventions had no greater than a second degree laceration (92%). Conclusions: The outcome of this study is supported by Albers (2002) and Dahlen (2007) which states the practice that positional changes may minimize perineal trauma. Nursing compliance for positional changes was higher (72%) than application of warm compresses (29%).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing Evidence Based Practice During the Second Stage of Labor: Application of Warm Compresses and Positional Changesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160983-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilizing Evidence Based Practice During the Second Stage of Labor: Application of Warm Compresses and Positional Changes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murphy-Smith, Mary, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Xavier Uniiversity</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3700 West 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773-298-3723</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">murphysmith@sxu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.T. Murphy-Smith, K. Wroble, Z. Boyadjian-Samawi, School of Nursing, St. Xavier University, Chicago , IL; M.T. Murphy-Smith, K. Wroble, Z. Boyadjian-Samawi, Maternal Child, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was two-fold: first, to determine whether the nursing interventions of positional changes and warm compresses to the perineum during the second stage of labor are factors that could prevent perineal trauma. The second was to evaluate nursing compliance with evidenced based practice interventions. Subjects: Study was conducted in a midwestern academic medical center that provides Level III Perinatal Services. All women that participated in the study received warm compresses and positional changes during the active phase of the second stage of labor. Methods: This was a retrospective review of pregnancy and birth data recorded into the electronic documentation system for women (N = 421) with normal vaginal births (92%), vacuum assisted (8%). The study intervention included positional changes (72%). These positional changes were hands/knees, right/left side-lying and semi-fowlers. The second intervention included perineal warm compresses which consisted of warm moist washcloths (28%). Chi-square tests were used for analysis. Results: The sample included 421 women with a mean age of 29 plus or minus 5.7 years. The majority were married (56%) and primigravidas (34%); 23% had received childbirth education. The mean weight of newborns was 3.3 kilograms. Most subjects did not receive an episiotomy (90%) due to institutional practice. Data analysis indicates that there were subjects with intact perineums (33%), first degree lacerations (26%) and second degree lacerations (33%). Subjects that received both interventions had no greater than a second degree laceration (92%). Conclusions: The outcome of this study is supported by Albers (2002) and Dahlen (2007) which states the practice that positional changes may minimize perineal trauma. Nursing compliance for positional changes was higher (72%) than application of warm compresses (29%).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:13:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:13:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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