2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160984
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Chemokines in Immune-mediated Cognitive Functioning
Abstract:
The Role of Chemokines in Immune-mediated Cognitive Functioning
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Palu, Maria, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Maria Palu
Contact Address:, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:858 220-4621
Co-Authors:M.L. Palu, H. Darwish, T.L. Briones, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Some chemokines (immune molecules that acts as chemoattractants) have been implicated in normal physiologic functioning. In this study we examined whether the chemokine, CXCL12, and its corresponding receptor, CXCR4, are involved in cognitive functioning such as learning and memory given that these immune system molecules are constitutively expressed in the adult hippocampus (brain region involved in memory processing). Fourteen male, adult Wistar rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to receive either CXCR4 antagonist to block receptor binding of CXCL12 (n=7) or normal saline (n=7) injections for control. The CXCR4 antagonist was given as daily subcutaneous injections for a period of 7 days at 12 mu l/day. Normal saline was also given as daily subcutaneous injections for a period of 7 days in volume equal to the CXCR4 antagonist. On the last day of subcutaneous injections, rats were tested in the water maze and spontaneous object recognition tasks to assess cognitive functioning. Water maze testing was performed for 4 days followed by 2 days of testing in the spontaneous object recognition task. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the behavioral testing, and brain tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and the sterological method of area fractionation. Rats injected with the CXCR4 antagonist show decreased CXCL12 expression in the hippocampus suggesting that receptor binding of CXCL12 was blocked. Futhermore, rats that received the CXCR4 antagonist show increased mean swim latency and path length to reach the goal in the water maze. As well, rats in the CXCR4 antagonist group show decreased discrimination ratio in the spontaneous object recognition task suggesting impaired ability to distinguish between the familiar and novel objects. These data suggest that blocking CXCR4 receptors leads to decreased CXCL12 availability in the brain, resulting in learning and memory impairment and providing direct evidence on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling and in memory processing. This study is clinically relevant in understanding the role of the immune system in cognitive functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Chemokines in Immune-mediated Cognitive Functioningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160984-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Role of Chemokines in Immune-mediated Cognitive Functioning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Palu, Maria, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Maria Palu</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">858 220-4621</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpalu2@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.L. Palu, H. Darwish, T.L. Briones, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Some chemokines (immune molecules that acts as chemoattractants) have been implicated in normal physiologic functioning. In this study we examined whether the chemokine, CXCL12, and its corresponding receptor, CXCR4, are involved in cognitive functioning such as learning and memory given that these immune system molecules are constitutively expressed in the adult hippocampus (brain region involved in memory processing). Fourteen male, adult Wistar rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to receive either CXCR4 antagonist to block receptor binding of CXCL12 (n=7) or normal saline (n=7) injections for control. The CXCR4 antagonist was given as daily subcutaneous injections for a period of 7 days at 12 mu l/day. Normal saline was also given as daily subcutaneous injections for a period of 7 days in volume equal to the CXCR4 antagonist. On the last day of subcutaneous injections, rats were tested in the water maze and spontaneous object recognition tasks to assess cognitive functioning. Water maze testing was performed for 4 days followed by 2 days of testing in the spontaneous object recognition task. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the behavioral testing, and brain tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and the sterological method of area fractionation. Rats injected with the CXCR4 antagonist show decreased CXCL12 expression in the hippocampus suggesting that receptor binding of CXCL12 was blocked. Futhermore, rats that received the CXCR4 antagonist show increased mean swim latency and path length to reach the goal in the water maze. As well, rats in the CXCR4 antagonist group show decreased discrimination ratio in the spontaneous object recognition task suggesting impaired ability to distinguish between the familiar and novel objects. These data suggest that blocking CXCR4 receptors leads to decreased CXCL12 availability in the brain, resulting in learning and memory impairment and providing direct evidence on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling and in memory processing. This study is clinically relevant in understanding the role of the immune system in cognitive functioning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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