An Examination of the Relationships among Selected Personal Factors, Self-Care Agency and Health Promoting Behaviors: A Secondary Data Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160986
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Examination of the Relationships among Selected Personal Factors, Self-Care Agency and Health Promoting Behaviors: A Secondary Data Analysis
Abstract:
An Examination of the Relationships among Selected Personal Factors, Self-Care Agency and Health Promoting Behaviors: A Secondary Data Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Peltzer, Jill, PhDc, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas School of Nursing
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-945-6819
Co-Authors:J.N. Peltzer, School of Nursing, The University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS; V.D. Sousa, School of Nursing, The University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS;
Research suggests that an individual's self-care agency (capacity to engage in self-care activities, including health promoting behaviors) is essential to maintain life and to improve health and well-being. Yet few studies have examined the relationship between individuals' selected personal factors, self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. Thus, the objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the strength and direction of the relationships among selected personal factors, self-care agency, and health promoting behaviors; and 2) evaluate the moderating effect of selected personal factors (age, education, income, and access to health insurance) on the relationship between self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. A descriptive correlational secondary data analysis design was used to conduct the study. The sample consisted of 629 adults who participated in a larger cross-sectional descriptive study that evaluated the psychometric properties of a Perception of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Scale. Data were collected with a demographic questionnaire, the appraisal of self-care agency-revised, and the health promotion lifestyle profile II. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical regression were used to analyze the data. The results showed that there were statistically significant relationships between education, income, access to health care insurance and self-care agency. In addition, there were statistically significant relationships between education, access to health care insurance and health promoting behaviors. Among the selected personal factors, only level of education moderated the relationship between self-care agency and health promoting behaviors (beta = -.43, p < 0.05). Individual personal characteristics are important factors for the development and maintenance of self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. Further research to examine the relationships among other personal factors, self-care agency, and health promoting behaviors is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Examination of the Relationships among Selected Personal Factors, Self-Care Agency and Health Promoting Behaviors: A Secondary Data Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160986-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Examination of the Relationships among Selected Personal Factors, Self-Care Agency and Health Promoting Behaviors: A Secondary Data Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peltzer, Jill, PhDc, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-945-6819</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpeltzer2@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.N. Peltzer, School of Nursing, The University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS; V.D. Sousa, School of Nursing, The University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research suggests that an individual's self-care agency (capacity to engage in self-care activities, including health promoting behaviors) is essential to maintain life and to improve health and well-being. Yet few studies have examined the relationship between individuals' selected personal factors, self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. Thus, the objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the strength and direction of the relationships among selected personal factors, self-care agency, and health promoting behaviors; and 2) evaluate the moderating effect of selected personal factors (age, education, income, and access to health insurance) on the relationship between self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. A descriptive correlational secondary data analysis design was used to conduct the study. The sample consisted of 629 adults who participated in a larger cross-sectional descriptive study that evaluated the psychometric properties of a Perception of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Scale. Data were collected with a demographic questionnaire, the appraisal of self-care agency-revised, and the health promotion lifestyle profile II. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical regression were used to analyze the data. The results showed that there were statistically significant relationships between education, income, access to health care insurance and self-care agency. In addition, there were statistically significant relationships between education, access to health care insurance and health promoting behaviors. Among the selected personal factors, only level of education moderated the relationship between self-care agency and health promoting behaviors (beta = -.43, p &lt; 0.05). Individual personal characteristics are important factors for the development and maintenance of self-care agency and health promoting behaviors. Further research to examine the relationships among other personal factors, self-care agency, and health promoting behaviors is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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