Feeding Interaction of Parents and Infants with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect: Infant and Parental Influence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160989
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feeding Interaction of Parents and Infants with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect: Infant and Parental Influence
Abstract:
Feeding Interaction of Parents and Infants with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect: Infant and Parental Influence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA
Contact Telephone:608-238-7536
Co-Authors:K.A. Pridham, R.L. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T.M. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, R. Fedderly, K. Mussatto, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospital of Wi
Background and Aims: Infants with a complex congenital heart defect(CCHD)have surgery soon after birth, delayed oral feeding,and long hospitalization. CCHD severity and parental feeding motivation and behavior may affect infant feeding behavior through the first year. We examined an ecological model of infant CCHD severity and parental feeding motivation effect on parental feeding affect and behavior and of these variables on infant feeding affect and behavior. Methods: Parents,18 years or older, of infants with a CCHD were recruited from a regional heart center.Except for a cardiologist's CCHD rating, all data, including primary caregiver(20 mothers, 3 fathers)feeding behavior were collected in the home at 1, 4 or 6, and 12 months. The videotaped feeding was coded with the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment rating scales for parent and infant regulation of negative affect and behavior (PNAB, INAB). Parents were interviewed about parenting and feeding. Directed content analysis was used to code parents' feeding motivation at 1 month. The contribution of CCHD severity and feeding motivation to adaptiveness of PNAB and INAB was examined with fixed occasions repeated measures regression analyses. Results: Parents averaged 33 years old and 70% were white. CCHD severity score was 5.0 (range 4-6.5) on a 10-point scale. Feeding motivations were: (a) reducing feeding difficulties (5 parents); (b) giving an adequate feeding (9 parents); and (c) developing a relationship (8 parents). PNAB and INAB scores were in the adaptive range, except at 4/6 months when the average PNAB score indicated some clinical concern. CCHD severity negatively affected both PNAB and INAB, although significantly only at 4/6 months. The parent's feeding motivation, developing a relationship, significantly and positively affected PNAB at 4/ 6 and at 12 months as well as INAB at 4/6 months. The consistently positive contribution of PNAB to INAB was significant at 1 month. Variability in feeding behavior was consistently significant. Conclusions: Despite limitations in variable range, power, and estimate stability,questions were generated about how feeding motivations affect parental care and about how parental care affects infant competencies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeeding Interaction of Parents and Infants with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect: Infant and Parental Influenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160989-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feeding Interaction of Parents and Infants with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect: Infant and Parental Influence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-238-7536</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.A. Pridham, R.L. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T.M. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, R. Fedderly, K. Mussatto, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospital of Wi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Aims: Infants with a complex congenital heart defect(CCHD)have surgery soon after birth, delayed oral feeding,and long hospitalization. CCHD severity and parental feeding motivation and behavior may affect infant feeding behavior through the first year. We examined an ecological model of infant CCHD severity and parental feeding motivation effect on parental feeding affect and behavior and of these variables on infant feeding affect and behavior. Methods: Parents,18 years or older, of infants with a CCHD were recruited from a regional heart center.Except for a cardiologist's CCHD rating, all data, including primary caregiver(20 mothers, 3 fathers)feeding behavior were collected in the home at 1, 4 or 6, and 12 months. The videotaped feeding was coded with the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment rating scales for parent and infant regulation of negative affect and behavior (PNAB, INAB). Parents were interviewed about parenting and feeding. Directed content analysis was used to code parents' feeding motivation at 1 month. The contribution of CCHD severity and feeding motivation to adaptiveness of PNAB and INAB was examined with fixed occasions repeated measures regression analyses. Results: Parents averaged 33 years old and 70% were white. CCHD severity score was 5.0 (range 4-6.5) on a 10-point scale. Feeding motivations were: (a) reducing feeding difficulties (5 parents); (b) giving an adequate feeding (9 parents); and (c) developing a relationship (8 parents). PNAB and INAB scores were in the adaptive range, except at 4/6 months when the average PNAB score indicated some clinical concern. CCHD severity negatively affected both PNAB and INAB, although significantly only at 4/6 months. The parent's feeding motivation, developing a relationship, significantly and positively affected PNAB at 4/ 6 and at 12 months as well as INAB at 4/6 months. The consistently positive contribution of PNAB to INAB was significant at 1 month. Variability in feeding behavior was consistently significant. Conclusions: Despite limitations in variable range, power, and estimate stability,questions were generated about how feeding motivations affect parental care and about how parental care affects infant competencies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.