2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160994
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Life Satisfaction One-Year after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Perceived Life Satisfaction One-Year after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Saban, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708-216-1244
Co-Authors:K.L. Saban, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; K.L. Saban, T.L. Pape, Center for Complex Chronic Care, Department of Veterans Affairs, Edward Hines Jr. Hospital, Hines, IL; T.L. Pape, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University
Medical advances have improved the odds of surviving severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) but knowledge about life satisfaction for individuals recovering consciousness within the first year of injury is lacking. Our primary aim is to describe self- reported life satisfaction for persons recovering consciousness one year after sTBI. A secondary aim is to identify variables predictive of life satisfaction. Methods: Data of 322 participants age 18 or older who recovered consciousness within one year sTBI after incurring unconsciousness for 28 days or more were abstracted from the prospective TBI Model Systems study. The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) was used to measure life satisfaction. Data at time of injury and then at one year post sTBI were available from the Craig Handicap Assessment Reporting Technique (CHART), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Regression analysis was used to identify predictors of SWLS. Results: The sample consisted of mostly (72%) young men (mean age 29 years) unconscious, on average, 44 days (SD = 19). Mean life satisfaction, on a scale of 4 to 24, was 17 (SD = 7) indicated a moderate level of perceived life satisfaction. A regression model including 1 year FIM, emergency room GCS, gender, age at injury and 1 year GOS-E indicated that these variables together significantly (p = .001) influenced self reported life satisfaction at 1year. Findings also indicate, however, that a limited amount of variance (R squared = .065) was explained with these combined variables. Conclusions: Findings suggest that life satisfaction is influenced by functioning at 1 year, injury severity, age, gender, and neurobehavioral status. While the findings are significant, the small amount of explained variance suggests that other variables not measured in this study may influence life satisfaction. Future research should examine indicators, such as pain, social support, and optimism, that have been show to influence life satisfaction in other populations. A better understanding of the factors influencing satisfaction with life will assist clinicians in tailoring more effective interventions for persons who have suffered a sTBI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Life Satisfaction One-Year after Severe Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160994-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Life Satisfaction One-Year after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Saban, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-216-1244</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksaban@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.L. Saban, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; K.L. Saban, T.L. Pape, Center for Complex Chronic Care, Department of Veterans Affairs, Edward Hines Jr. Hospital, Hines, IL; T.L. Pape, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Medical advances have improved the odds of surviving severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) but knowledge about life satisfaction for individuals recovering consciousness within the first year of injury is lacking. Our primary aim is to describe self- reported life satisfaction for persons recovering consciousness one year after sTBI. A secondary aim is to identify variables predictive of life satisfaction. Methods: Data of 322 participants age 18 or older who recovered consciousness within one year sTBI after incurring unconsciousness for 28 days or more were abstracted from the prospective TBI Model Systems study. The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) was used to measure life satisfaction. Data at time of injury and then at one year post sTBI were available from the Craig Handicap Assessment Reporting Technique (CHART), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Regression analysis was used to identify predictors of SWLS. Results: The sample consisted of mostly (72%) young men (mean age 29 years) unconscious, on average, 44 days (SD = 19). Mean life satisfaction, on a scale of 4 to 24, was 17 (SD = 7) indicated a moderate level of perceived life satisfaction. A regression model including 1 year FIM, emergency room GCS, gender, age at injury and 1 year GOS-E indicated that these variables together significantly (p = .001) influenced self reported life satisfaction at 1year. Findings also indicate, however, that a limited amount of variance (R squared = .065) was explained with these combined variables. Conclusions: Findings suggest that life satisfaction is influenced by functioning at 1 year, injury severity, age, gender, and neurobehavioral status. While the findings are significant, the small amount of explained variance suggests that other variables not measured in this study may influence life satisfaction. Future research should examine indicators, such as pain, social support, and optimism, that have been show to influence life satisfaction in other populations. A better understanding of the factors influencing satisfaction with life will assist clinicians in tailoring more effective interventions for persons who have suffered a sTBI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.