Incorporating Jitprapatsorn--a Buddhist Idea Meaning 'Clear Clean Mind Meditation'--Into Natural Childbirth Practices: Action Research in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160995
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incorporating Jitprapatsorn--a Buddhist Idea Meaning 'Clear Clean Mind Meditation'--Into Natural Childbirth Practices: Action Research in Thailand
Abstract:
Incorporating Jitprapatsorn--a Buddhist Idea Meaning 'Clear Clean Mind Meditation'--Into Natural Childbirth Practices: Action Research in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sawatphanit, Wilaiphan, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Burapha University
Title:Faculty of Nursing
Contact Address:169 Long-Hard Bangsaen Road, Bangsaen, Chon Buri, 20131, Thailand
Contact Telephone:81-613-1077
Co-Authors:W. Sawatphanit, Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University, Chon Buri, THAILAND; R. Ross, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; M. Sobsama, , Samitivech Hospital, Bangkok, THAILAND; P. Sumphaokaew, P. Kasiolan, S. Sompid Dussadee, S. Sriwat, ,
Problem: Natural childbirth models are abundant in western cultures, but not many are found in eastern cultures. Purpose: To develop a model for natural childbirth that incorporates Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist concept meaning "clear, clean mind meditation"?into nursing practices surrounding natural childbirth. Framework: Jitprapatsorn, a Buddhist belief (Machee Sansanee, 1987) and Lewin's (1958) action research framework were used to guide the study. Subjects: Sixteen pregnant women and their spouses and five prenatal/OB RNs at a hospital in Thailand. Methods: Prenatal and OB nurses (n=5) who worked at a Thai hospital agreed to participate in the study. They were trained by PI on natural childbirth services using Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist belief and practice which is meant to lead to a calm mind. The RNs then recruited 16 second trimester pregnant women (with spouses) who subsequently attended 3 training sessions on empowerment using Jitprapatsorn during childbirth. The couples learned how to use Jitprapatsorn, along with standard services (e.g., breathing techniques, birth ball use, aroma therapy, herbal massage). During labor and delivery, the couples applied the methods learned from the training. Two days after delivery, the couples were interviewed in-depth (in focus groups) about their experiences. Results: All 16 women had normal labor without pain medications or complications (e.g., hemorrhage, infection). They all successfully breast fed. All of the newborns had an APGAR score of at least 8 at 1 minute after birth. The women and their spouses stated that they were strongly satisfied with their natural childbirth experiences and that their spousal relationships were strengthened by Jitprapatsorn. The pregnant women asserted that Jitprapatsorn helped them to feel peaceful during labor. Also, the participants felt that the bond between mother and baby was stronger due to Jitprapatsorn. Finally, all five RNs stated that they were very satisfied with the results of their nursing care because of Jitprapatsorn. Conclusions: Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist form of meditation?should be encouraged during natural childbirth labor and delivery in other hospitals in Thailand.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncorporating Jitprapatsorn--a Buddhist Idea Meaning 'Clear Clean Mind Meditation'--Into Natural Childbirth Practices: Action Research in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160995-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incorporating Jitprapatsorn--a Buddhist Idea Meaning 'Clear Clean Mind Meditation'--Into Natural Childbirth Practices: Action Research in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sawatphanit, Wilaiphan, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Burapha University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">169 Long-Hard Bangsaen Road, Bangsaen, Chon Buri, 20131, Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">81-613-1077</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sawilaiphan@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W. Sawatphanit, Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University, Chon Buri, THAILAND; R. Ross, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; M. Sobsama, , Samitivech Hospital, Bangkok, THAILAND; P. Sumphaokaew, P. Kasiolan, S. Sompid Dussadee, S. Sriwat, , </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Natural childbirth models are abundant in western cultures, but not many are found in eastern cultures. Purpose: To develop a model for natural childbirth that incorporates Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist concept meaning &quot;clear, clean mind meditation&quot;?into nursing practices surrounding natural childbirth. Framework: Jitprapatsorn, a Buddhist belief (Machee Sansanee, 1987) and Lewin's (1958) action research framework were used to guide the study. Subjects: Sixteen pregnant women and their spouses and five prenatal/OB RNs at a hospital in Thailand. Methods: Prenatal and OB nurses (n=5) who worked at a Thai hospital agreed to participate in the study. They were trained by PI on natural childbirth services using Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist belief and practice which is meant to lead to a calm mind. The RNs then recruited 16 second trimester pregnant women (with spouses) who subsequently attended 3 training sessions on empowerment using Jitprapatsorn during childbirth. The couples learned how to use Jitprapatsorn, along with standard services (e.g., breathing techniques, birth ball use, aroma therapy, herbal massage). During labor and delivery, the couples applied the methods learned from the training. Two days after delivery, the couples were interviewed in-depth (in focus groups) about their experiences. Results: All 16 women had normal labor without pain medications or complications (e.g., hemorrhage, infection). They all successfully breast fed. All of the newborns had an APGAR score of at least 8 at 1 minute after birth. The women and their spouses stated that they were strongly satisfied with their natural childbirth experiences and that their spousal relationships were strengthened by Jitprapatsorn. The pregnant women asserted that Jitprapatsorn helped them to feel peaceful during labor. Also, the participants felt that the bond between mother and baby was stronger due to Jitprapatsorn. Finally, all five RNs stated that they were very satisfied with the results of their nursing care because of Jitprapatsorn. Conclusions: Jitprapatsorn?a Buddhist form of meditation?should be encouraged during natural childbirth labor and delivery in other hospitals in Thailand.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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