2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160996
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Guided Imagery on Pain in Children
Abstract:
The Effect of Guided Imagery on Pain in Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schmidt, Nola, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Valparaiso University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:836 LaPorte Ave., Valparaiso, IN, 46383, USA
Contact Telephone:219-464-5288
Co-Authors:N.A. Schmidt, College of Nursing, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN; D. Calamaras, J.K. Nuuhiwa, J.R. Beatty, S. Gammerman, , Children's Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL;
Pain is of concern to both clinicians and patients, as there is evidence that pain limits healing and alters neuropathways. While medication is considered the quiescent treatment for pain, there is evidence that non-pharmacological interventions can be adjuncts to reducing pain. Imagery, a multi-sensory representation of an experience that uses imagination to invoke visual, auditory, smell, taste, sense of movement, position, and touch perceptions, has been used for relaxation, increasing cooperation, pain management, preparation for change, improving immune function, and increasing patient control and input into health care (Solomon & Saylor, 1995). The aim of this pilot was to examine the effect of guided imagery on children's perceptions of pain and their pain medication usage. Hospitalized children (N=17), ages 7-16, who experienced pain associated with sickle cell disease, cancer, stem cell transplant, or hemophilia participated. Using a classic experimental design, children in the experimental group were taught guided imagery by staff nurses trained in the technique. All children recorded their pain intensities and interventions used to reduce pain in a colorful pain diary designed for the study, resulting in 236 usable diary entries. Daily pain medication usage was also calculated for each subject. The adjusted mean post intervention pain rating was nonsignificant (p=0.0643). However, these findings may be clinically significant since the average post intervention pain intensity mean for the experimental group was 4.2, compared to the control group of 5.2. There was no significant difference in the medication usage between the groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Guided Imagery on Pain in Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160996-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Guided Imagery on Pain in Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Nola, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valparaiso University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">836 LaPorte Ave., Valparaiso, IN, 46383, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">219-464-5288</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nola.Schmidt@valpo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.A. Schmidt, College of Nursing, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN; D. Calamaras, J.K. Nuuhiwa, J.R. Beatty, S. Gammerman, , Children's Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is of concern to both clinicians and patients, as there is evidence that pain limits healing and alters neuropathways. While medication is considered the quiescent treatment for pain, there is evidence that non-pharmacological interventions can be adjuncts to reducing pain. Imagery, a multi-sensory representation of an experience that uses imagination to invoke visual, auditory, smell, taste, sense of movement, position, and touch perceptions, has been used for relaxation, increasing cooperation, pain management, preparation for change, improving immune function, and increasing patient control and input into health care (Solomon &amp; Saylor, 1995). The aim of this pilot was to examine the effect of guided imagery on children's perceptions of pain and their pain medication usage. Hospitalized children (N=17), ages 7-16, who experienced pain associated with sickle cell disease, cancer, stem cell transplant, or hemophilia participated. Using a classic experimental design, children in the experimental group were taught guided imagery by staff nurses trained in the technique. All children recorded their pain intensities and interventions used to reduce pain in a colorful pain diary designed for the study, resulting in 236 usable diary entries. Daily pain medication usage was also calculated for each subject. The adjusted mean post intervention pain rating was nonsignificant (p=0.0643). However, these findings may be clinically significant since the average post intervention pain intensity mean for the experimental group was 4.2, compared to the control group of 5.2. There was no significant difference in the medication usage between the groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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