2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160998
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Magnet Status: Implications for Quality of Patient Care
Abstract:
Magnet Status: Implications for Quality of Patient Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Scott, Kelly, BSN-in progress
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:4144 Booth Place #21, #21, Kansas City, KS, 66103, USA
Contact Telephone:785 2181224
Co-Authors:K.A. Scott, N. Dunton, School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS;
Purpose: Research has shown that hospital structure, e.g. nursing characteristics, affects patient outcomes. Nursing characteristics have been shown to be better in Magnet hospitals. Previous studies have shown that nursing workforce characteristics such as nurse-to-patient ratio, job satisfaction, and skill mix correlate with lower incidence of nosocomial infection and higher nurse-reported and patient-reported quality of care. Little research has been done, however, on the correlation between Magnet status and patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine if patients have fewer nosocomial infections in Magnet hospitals than non-Magnet hospitals. Theoretical Framework: The Donabedian structure-processes-outcomes model for assessing quality of health care. Method: Descriptive correlational design. Sample: Over 500 critical care units from hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. Results: Preliminary analysis shows that four nursing workforce characteristics were higher in Magnet hospitals, but the mean rates of three types of nosocomial infections were similar for Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Multivariate analysis is in progress. Conclusions. Preliminary analysis for this study does not support the assumption that because Magnet hospitals have superior nursing workforce attributes they would also have lower nosocomial infection rates. Multivariate analysis is underway to identify nursing characteristics and processes that explain the lack of superior performance by Magnet hospitals. If the workforce characteristics that contribute to Magnet accreditation do not lead to a higher quality of care, then what factors determine higher quality of patient care and how do hospitals achieve this quality of care for patients?
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMagnet Status: Implications for Quality of Patient Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160998-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Magnet Status: Implications for Quality of Patient Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scott, Kelly, BSN-in progress</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4144 Booth Place #21, #21, Kansas City, KS, 66103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">785 2181224</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kscott2@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.A. Scott, N. Dunton, School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Research has shown that hospital structure, e.g. nursing characteristics, affects patient outcomes. Nursing characteristics have been shown to be better in Magnet hospitals. Previous studies have shown that nursing workforce characteristics such as nurse-to-patient ratio, job satisfaction, and skill mix correlate with lower incidence of nosocomial infection and higher nurse-reported and patient-reported quality of care. Little research has been done, however, on the correlation between Magnet status and patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine if patients have fewer nosocomial infections in Magnet hospitals than non-Magnet hospitals. Theoretical Framework: The Donabedian structure-processes-outcomes model for assessing quality of health care. Method: Descriptive correlational design. Sample: Over 500 critical care units from hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. Results: Preliminary analysis shows that four nursing workforce characteristics were higher in Magnet hospitals, but the mean rates of three types of nosocomial infections were similar for Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Multivariate analysis is in progress. Conclusions. Preliminary analysis for this study does not support the assumption that because Magnet hospitals have superior nursing workforce attributes they would also have lower nosocomial infection rates. Multivariate analysis is underway to identify nursing characteristics and processes that explain the lack of superior performance by Magnet hospitals. If the workforce characteristics that contribute to Magnet accreditation do not lead to a higher quality of care, then what factors determine higher quality of patient care and how do hospitals achieve this quality of care for patients?</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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