Adherence to Prescribed Exercise and Diet Regimens 2 Months Post Cardiac Rehabilitation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160999
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence to Prescribed Exercise and Diet Regimens 2 Months Post Cardiac Rehabilitation
Abstract:
Adherence to Prescribed Exercise and Diet Regimens 2 Months Post Cardiac Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Scotto, Carrie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA
Contact Telephone:330-972-7885
Co-Authors:C.J. Scotto, College of Nursing, University of Akron, Akron, OH; C.J. Scotto, D. Waechter, J. Rosneck, Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, Summa Health System , Akron, OH;
Background: Non-adherence to prescribed medication, diet, and activity has long been cited as the most common cause of worsening symptoms, hospital readmission, and mortality for people with cardiac disease. Although the problem of non-adherence is widely acknowledged, the wide range of variables and lack of consistency in measurement have not provided a clear and accurate picture of the extent and nature of the problem. Examining more discrete aspects of the problem will address specific issues and provide foundational information to develop effective interventions to promote adherence. Purpose: To determine cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participants' knowledge of diet and exercise prescription and the degree of adherence to diet and exercise 2 months after completing CR. Methods: Pre program, end program, and 2 months post program diet knowledge and exercise tolerance/functional capacity scores were compared for 174 patients completing CR. Demographic and clinical variables were examined to determine relationships to adherence. Phone interviews were conducted to determine actual dietary and exercise practices 2 months post program. Results: Diet knowledge and exercise tolerance/functional capacity scores were significantly higher at end program (T = -7.98, P = 0.000; T = -8.20, p = 0.000). Scores decreased 2 months post program, but not significantly. Despite improvement and maintenance of knowledge, the actual reports of the participants indicated the majority did not know what diet or exercise were prescribed at discharge. Additionally the majority was not following the diet or engaging in exercise. None of the demographic or clinical variables were found to be significantly related to adherence variables. Conclusion: Although CR participants gain much knowledge about necessary dietary changes and improve their exercise tolerance/functional capacity during rehab, many fail to translate the information into actual behavior changes after completing the program. Research to identify methods to improve incorporation of knowledge into post CR life is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to Prescribed Exercise and Diet Regimens 2 Months Post Cardiac Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160999-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adherence to Prescribed Exercise and Diet Regimens 2 Months Post Cardiac Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scotto, Carrie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2688 Cardington Green, Uniontown, OH, 44685, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-972-7885</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscotto@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.J. Scotto, College of Nursing, University of Akron, Akron, OH; C.J. Scotto, D. Waechter, J. Rosneck, Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, Summa Health System , Akron, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Non-adherence to prescribed medication, diet, and activity has long been cited as the most common cause of worsening symptoms, hospital readmission, and mortality for people with cardiac disease. Although the problem of non-adherence is widely acknowledged, the wide range of variables and lack of consistency in measurement have not provided a clear and accurate picture of the extent and nature of the problem. Examining more discrete aspects of the problem will address specific issues and provide foundational information to develop effective interventions to promote adherence. Purpose: To determine cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participants' knowledge of diet and exercise prescription and the degree of adherence to diet and exercise 2 months after completing CR. Methods: Pre program, end program, and 2 months post program diet knowledge and exercise tolerance/functional capacity scores were compared for 174 patients completing CR. Demographic and clinical variables were examined to determine relationships to adherence. Phone interviews were conducted to determine actual dietary and exercise practices 2 months post program. Results: Diet knowledge and exercise tolerance/functional capacity scores were significantly higher at end program (T = -7.98, P = 0.000; T = -8.20, p = 0.000). Scores decreased 2 months post program, but not significantly. Despite improvement and maintenance of knowledge, the actual reports of the participants indicated the majority did not know what diet or exercise were prescribed at discharge. Additionally the majority was not following the diet or engaging in exercise. None of the demographic or clinical variables were found to be significantly related to adherence variables. Conclusion: Although CR participants gain much knowledge about necessary dietary changes and improve their exercise tolerance/functional capacity during rehab, many fail to translate the information into actual behavior changes after completing the program. Research to identify methods to improve incorporation of knowledge into post CR life is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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