Self-Transcendence, Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Practices and The Alternative Health Care Practices of The Amish

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161001
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Transcendence, Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Practices and The Alternative Health Care Practices of The Amish
Abstract:
Self-Transcendence, Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Practices and The Alternative Health Care Practices of The Amish
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sharpnack, Patricia, DNP, RN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:Ursuline College
Contact Address:12999 Claridon Troy Road, Chardon, OH, 44024, USA
Contact Telephone:440-635-0226
Co-Authors:P.A. Sharpnack, A.M. Benders, The Breen School of Nursing, Ursuline College, Pepper Pike, OH; M.T. Quinn Griffin, J.J. Fitzpatrick, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, CWRU, Cleveland, OH;
Background: Although the use of spiritual and alternative healthcare practices is increasing in the United States, there are few studies that identify the spiritual/alternative practices of the Amish. The relationship between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being in the Amish has not been investigated. Purpose: To examine self-transcendence and spiritual well-being, and explore the spiritual and alternative health care practices among the Amish. Conceptual Framework: Reed's Theory of Self-Transcendence provided the theoretical framework for the study. Methods: Descriptive correlational study. Five instruments were used in a sample of 551 randomly selected adult, Amish persons in Geauga County, Ohio. Surveys were mailed to the selected individuals and were returned anonymously. Results: There was a 27% response rate. The majority of the respondents was female, married, average age of 48 years. High levels of spiritual well-being and self-transcendence were found. Self-transcendence was positively correlated to spiritual well-being. More than 95% of the respondents reported using spiritual practices such as prayer, reading spiritual materials, helping others, and family activities. Use of spiritual and alternative healthcare choices was common. Conclusions: The association between well-being and transcendence has implications for nursing. Including spiritual concerns in the plan of care for patients is vital. The use of spiritual and alternative healthcare practice supports a holistic belief model where the mind, body and spirit are entwined. The use of these practices also promotes the perception of well-being. Integrating the concept of spirituality and modeling its use in nursing curricula would better prepare nurses in the provision of holistic care. A broader education about complementary and alternative healthcare measures and therapeutic interventions would assist in the acceptance of these choices by nurses. Further research with these variables is needed to explore differences between the Amish and the dominant culture. Intervention studies are needed also.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Transcendence, Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Practices and The Alternative Health Care Practices of The Amishen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161001-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Transcendence, Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Practices and The Alternative Health Care Practices of The Amish</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sharpnack, Patricia, DNP, RN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ursuline College</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">12999 Claridon Troy Road, Chardon, OH, 44024, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">440-635-0226</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">psharpnack@ursuline.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.A. Sharpnack, A.M. Benders, The Breen School of Nursing, Ursuline College, Pepper Pike, OH; M.T. Quinn Griffin, J.J. Fitzpatrick, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, CWRU, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Although the use of spiritual and alternative healthcare practices is increasing in the United States, there are few studies that identify the spiritual/alternative practices of the Amish. The relationship between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being in the Amish has not been investigated. Purpose: To examine self-transcendence and spiritual well-being, and explore the spiritual and alternative health care practices among the Amish. Conceptual Framework: Reed's Theory of Self-Transcendence provided the theoretical framework for the study. Methods: Descriptive correlational study. Five instruments were used in a sample of 551 randomly selected adult, Amish persons in Geauga County, Ohio. Surveys were mailed to the selected individuals and were returned anonymously. Results: There was a 27% response rate. The majority of the respondents was female, married, average age of 48 years. High levels of spiritual well-being and self-transcendence were found. Self-transcendence was positively correlated to spiritual well-being. More than 95% of the respondents reported using spiritual practices such as prayer, reading spiritual materials, helping others, and family activities. Use of spiritual and alternative healthcare choices was common. Conclusions: The association between well-being and transcendence has implications for nursing. Including spiritual concerns in the plan of care for patients is vital. The use of spiritual and alternative healthcare practice supports a holistic belief model where the mind, body and spirit are entwined. The use of these practices also promotes the perception of well-being. Integrating the concept of spirituality and modeling its use in nursing curricula would better prepare nurses in the provision of holistic care. A broader education about complementary and alternative healthcare measures and therapeutic interventions would assist in the acceptance of these choices by nurses. Further research with these variables is needed to explore differences between the Amish and the dominant culture. Intervention studies are needed also.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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