2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161002
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adverse Events: Activating a Rapid Response Team to Improve Patient Safety
Abstract:
Adverse Events: Activating a Rapid Response Team to Improve Patient Safety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sittner, Barbara, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing
Contact Address:1230 'O' Street Suite 131, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Contact Telephone:402-472-7376
Co-Authors:B. Sittner, M. Hagerman, , University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing , Lincoln, NE; B. George, , Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center , Lincoln, NE;
Failure to rescue is one of the nursing outcomes gaining importance when examining the quality of patient care (Schmid, Hoffman, Happ, Wolf,& DeVita, 2007). Hospitals have initiated Rapid Response Teams (RRT's) to reduce in-hospital cardiac arrests, total and unplanned intensive care unit admissions, and hospital mortality (Thomas, Force, Rasmussen, Dodd, & Whildin, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of RRT's at a midwestern medical center. A retrospective review of the monthly computer-generated RRT database was conducted between the months of March 2007 to September 2007. The data abstracted from the medical center's database included information from 142 RRT's activated. This study found 45% of those activating RRT's were due to a change in patient vital signs. Patient vital signs include: respiratory rate greater than 28, heart rate greater than 130 bpm, and systolic blood pressure less than 90 mmHg. The study also revealed that 38% of RRT calls came from the surgical nursing floor. The majority of RRT calls were during the day shift from 0700 to 1900 at 56%. Respiratory support 30% was the intervention performed the most frequently after a RRT had been activated. Approximately 60% of the patients that had RRT activation were not transferred to a higher level of care, 19% of patients were transferred to CCU, 15% transferred to PCU, and only 2% of patients either went to the operating room or died. Study findings support the need for nurses to recognize clinical instability, provide prompt interventions, and activate RRT's to decrease transfers to higher levels of care and decrease patient mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdverse Events: Activating a Rapid Response Team to Improve Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161002-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adverse Events: Activating a Rapid Response Team to Improve Patient Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sittner, Barbara, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1230 'O' Street Suite 131, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-472-7376</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsittner@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Sittner, M. Hagerman, , University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing , Lincoln, NE; B. George, , Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center , Lincoln, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Failure to rescue is one of the nursing outcomes gaining importance when examining the quality of patient care (Schmid, Hoffman, Happ, Wolf,&amp; DeVita, 2007). Hospitals have initiated Rapid Response Teams (RRT's) to reduce in-hospital cardiac arrests, total and unplanned intensive care unit admissions, and hospital mortality (Thomas, Force, Rasmussen, Dodd, &amp; Whildin, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of RRT's at a midwestern medical center. A retrospective review of the monthly computer-generated RRT database was conducted between the months of March 2007 to September 2007. The data abstracted from the medical center's database included information from 142 RRT's activated. This study found 45% of those activating RRT's were due to a change in patient vital signs. Patient vital signs include: respiratory rate greater than 28, heart rate greater than 130 bpm, and systolic blood pressure less than 90 mmHg. The study also revealed that 38% of RRT calls came from the surgical nursing floor. The majority of RRT calls were during the day shift from 0700 to 1900 at 56%. Respiratory support 30% was the intervention performed the most frequently after a RRT had been activated. Approximately 60% of the patients that had RRT activation were not transferred to a higher level of care, 19% of patients were transferred to CCU, 15% transferred to PCU, and only 2% of patients either went to the operating room or died. Study findings support the need for nurses to recognize clinical instability, provide prompt interventions, and activate RRT's to decrease transfers to higher levels of care and decrease patient mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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