Human Simulation Educational Experiences: Does Participation, Versus Observation, Affect Learning?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161003
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Simulation Educational Experiences: Does Participation, Versus Observation, Affect Learning?
Abstract:
Human Simulation Educational Experiences: Does Participation, Versus Observation, Affect Learning?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Smith, Kit
P.I. Institution Name:UMKC
Contact Address:2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816-235-1714
Co-Authors:K.V. Smith, J. Klaassen, C. Zimmerman, A. Cheng, Nursing, UMKC, Kansas City, MO;
High fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) uses state of the art technology to enhance student learning in a safe and lifelike setting. Following adult education theoretical principles, HFPS experiences in a Legal and Ethical Issues course actively engage students and provide immediate application of content to bridge the gap between this didactic course and students' clinical practice. Previous course evaluations were very positive and indicated students want more simulated experiences but the problem is that, with 85 students enrolled, all students cannot be accommodated in more scenarios. So the research question guiding this study was: Is the effectiveness of the learning experience affected by students' participation in, versus observation of, HFPS scenarios? Junior level nursing students (N=85) enrolled in a fall semester Legal and Ethical Issues course are participating in this descriptive, comparative study. Groups of 12 randomly assigned nursing students complete the simulated experiences at the same time, with 4 of the 12 students participating in the scenario and 8 observing. All 12 students participate together in the scenario debriefing session. Using this format, the course includes 3 different scenarios, so that over the semester each student participates in 1 scenario and observes 2 scenarios. When data collection concludes in December 2009, paired t test analysis for each of the three scenarios will determine if significant differences exist on individual student's pre and post test scores. Independent t test analysis will then determine differences between the two groups (students participating versus students observing) on the following post scenario measures: (a) significance of differences on pre and post test scores, (b) peer evaluations, (c) faculty evaluations, and (d) student attitudes. Qualitative student feedback on the simulated experiences will be examined using content analysis. Results of this study will inform subsequent teaching strategies regarding legal and ethical content in the undergraduate curriculum.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman Simulation Educational Experiences: Does Participation, Versus Observation, Affect Learning?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161003-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Human Simulation Educational Experiences: Does Participation, Versus Observation, Affect Learning?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Kit</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UMKC</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816-235-1714</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smithkv@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.V. Smith, J. Klaassen, C. Zimmerman, A. Cheng, Nursing, UMKC, Kansas City, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">High fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) uses state of the art technology to enhance student learning in a safe and lifelike setting. Following adult education theoretical principles, HFPS experiences in a Legal and Ethical Issues course actively engage students and provide immediate application of content to bridge the gap between this didactic course and students' clinical practice. Previous course evaluations were very positive and indicated students want more simulated experiences but the problem is that, with 85 students enrolled, all students cannot be accommodated in more scenarios. So the research question guiding this study was: Is the effectiveness of the learning experience affected by students' participation in, versus observation of, HFPS scenarios? Junior level nursing students (N=85) enrolled in a fall semester Legal and Ethical Issues course are participating in this descriptive, comparative study. Groups of 12 randomly assigned nursing students complete the simulated experiences at the same time, with 4 of the 12 students participating in the scenario and 8 observing. All 12 students participate together in the scenario debriefing session. Using this format, the course includes 3 different scenarios, so that over the semester each student participates in 1 scenario and observes 2 scenarios. When data collection concludes in December 2009, paired t test analysis for each of the three scenarios will determine if significant differences exist on individual student's pre and post test scores. Independent t test analysis will then determine differences between the two groups (students participating versus students observing) on the following post scenario measures: (a) significance of differences on pre and post test scores, (b) peer evaluations, (c) faculty evaluations, and (d) student attitudes. Qualitative student feedback on the simulated experiences will be examined using content analysis. Results of this study will inform subsequent teaching strategies regarding legal and ethical content in the undergraduate curriculum.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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