Measuring Depression, Negative, and Positive Thinking During a Brief Psychiatric Inpatient Stay

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161005
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Depression, Negative, and Positive Thinking During a Brief Psychiatric Inpatient Stay
Abstract:
Measuring Depression, Negative, and Positive Thinking During a Brief Psychiatric Inpatient Stay
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Forsyth, Diane, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Contact Address:Master's in Nursing, Houston, MN, 55943, USA
Co-Authors:K. Poppe and V. Nash, Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore differences in depression and positive and negative thinking at admission and at discharge (N=487) on an adult inpatient mood disorders unit. A nurse led cognitive behavior group therapy was the main patient education intervention on the unit. Paired t-tests were completed for admission and discharge scores for the Automatic Thought Questionnaire (ATQ) Negative, ATQ Positive, ATQ Total scores, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Hamilton-D scores. All scores showed a significant change (p<0.001) from scores at admission to discharge. The ATQ total scores and each of the subscales (positive and negative) showed a significant change in thinking (p=0.001) between admission and discharge. Both positive and negative scores were in the desired direction for change from admission to discharge. The BDI-II scores indicated that patients showed a significant improvement in depressive symptoms from admission to discharge. Results were similar for the Ham-D also showing a significant change in symptoms between admission and discharge. The results of this study indicate that depressed patients who receive CBT displayed decreased depressive symptoms and both decreased their negative thinking and increased their positive thinking, as measured by the ATQ, from admission to discharge within a brief hospital stay. Although the effect of a CBT inpatient group cannot be isolated with this study, it is assumed that the CBT group was a main factor for patients' improvement. Further sub-dividing nursing interventions on an inpatient unit can foster understanding of elements that assist patient improvement with depressive symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Depression, Negative, and Positive Thinking During a Brief Psychiatric Inpatient Stayen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161005-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Depression, Negative, and Positive Thinking During a Brief Psychiatric Inpatient Stay</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forsyth, Diane, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Master's in Nursing, Houston, MN, 55943, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dforsyth@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Poppe and V. Nash, Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore differences in depression and positive and negative thinking at admission and at discharge (N=487) on an adult inpatient mood disorders unit. A nurse led cognitive behavior group therapy was the main patient education intervention on the unit. Paired t-tests were completed for admission and discharge scores for the Automatic Thought Questionnaire (ATQ) Negative, ATQ Positive, ATQ Total scores, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Hamilton-D scores. All scores showed a significant change (p&lt;0.001) from scores at admission to discharge. The ATQ total scores and each of the subscales (positive and negative) showed a significant change in thinking (p=0.001) between admission and discharge. Both positive and negative scores were in the desired direction for change from admission to discharge. The BDI-II scores indicated that patients showed a significant improvement in depressive symptoms from admission to discharge. Results were similar for the Ham-D also showing a significant change in symptoms between admission and discharge. The results of this study indicate that depressed patients who receive CBT displayed decreased depressive symptoms and both decreased their negative thinking and increased their positive thinking, as measured by the ATQ, from admission to discharge within a brief hospital stay. Although the effect of a CBT inpatient group cannot be isolated with this study, it is assumed that the CBT group was a main factor for patients' improvement. Further sub-dividing nursing interventions on an inpatient unit can foster understanding of elements that assist patient improvement with depressive symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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