Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students Toward Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161007
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students Toward Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact
Abstract:
Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students Toward Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hamaideh, Shaher, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The Hashemite University
Contact Address:Community and Mental Health Nursing/Faculty of Nursing, The Hashemite University, Zarka, 13133, Jordan
In Jordan, as well as many other countries, many people have negative or prejudiced attitudes toward mental illness and individuals with mental illness. These attitudes may arise due to the lack of accurate information about mental illness or the lack of contact with individuals with mental illness. Also, attitudes toward mental illness have been found to influence the care given to mental clients by nurses working with them. Therefore, it is important that the Jordanian nursing students, who will work with those clients in the future, to develop positive and realistic attitudes toward mental illness. It is hypothesized that the Jordanian nursing students will change their attitudes toward mental illness positively if they given the correct information and being in contact with individuals with mental illness through studying psychiatric/mental health nursing course, both theoretical and clinical parts. "Opinions about Mental Illness" (OMI) scale that was developed and modified by Cohen and Struening (1963, 1962) was used to measure the students' attitudes toward mental illness. OMI consists of 51 items scored on 6-point Likert-type scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree and acceptable validity and reliability are reported. OMI consists of 5 scales: Authoritarianism, Benevolence, Mental Hygiene Ideology, Social Restrictiveness, and Interpersonal Etiology. Quasi-experimental, one group pretest-posttest design was used to test the hypotheses. A sample of 193 Jordanian nursing students at the Hashemite University agreed to participate in this study. Data were collected at two points: before and after studying the course. Significant results of the study were: (1) that nursing students have positive attitudes toward mental illness on four of the five scales, (2) a difference in attitudes toward the mental illness between students who have previous contact with mental clients and those who did not, and (3) that students' attitudes about mental illness changed positively after taking the psychiatric/mental health course. Attitudes about mental illness will positively changed if myths about mental illness are corrected plus expose to mentally ill clients. Special attention should be given to improve the Social Restrictiveness scale.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students Toward Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contacten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161007-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students Toward Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hamaideh, Shaher, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Hashemite University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community and Mental Health Nursing/Faculty of Nursing, The Hashemite University, Zarka, 13133, Jordan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shaher29@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Jordan, as well as many other countries, many people have negative or prejudiced attitudes toward mental illness and individuals with mental illness. These attitudes may arise due to the lack of accurate information about mental illness or the lack of contact with individuals with mental illness. Also, attitudes toward mental illness have been found to influence the care given to mental clients by nurses working with them. Therefore, it is important that the Jordanian nursing students, who will work with those clients in the future, to develop positive and realistic attitudes toward mental illness. It is hypothesized that the Jordanian nursing students will change their attitudes toward mental illness positively if they given the correct information and being in contact with individuals with mental illness through studying psychiatric/mental health nursing course, both theoretical and clinical parts. &quot;Opinions about Mental Illness&quot; (OMI) scale that was developed and modified by Cohen and Struening (1963, 1962) was used to measure the students' attitudes toward mental illness. OMI consists of 51 items scored on 6-point Likert-type scale ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree and acceptable validity and reliability are reported. OMI consists of 5 scales: Authoritarianism, Benevolence, Mental Hygiene Ideology, Social Restrictiveness, and Interpersonal Etiology. Quasi-experimental, one group pretest-posttest design was used to test the hypotheses. A sample of 193 Jordanian nursing students at the Hashemite University agreed to participate in this study. Data were collected at two points: before and after studying the course. Significant results of the study were: (1) that nursing students have positive attitudes toward mental illness on four of the five scales, (2) a difference in attitudes toward the mental illness between students who have previous contact with mental clients and those who did not, and (3) that students' attitudes about mental illness changed positively after taking the psychiatric/mental health course. Attitudes about mental illness will positively changed if myths about mental illness are corrected plus expose to mentally ill clients. Special attention should be given to improve the Social Restrictiveness scale.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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