Traditional and Nontraditional Nursing Roles in a Telemedicine Home Spirometry Monitoring Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161008
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Traditional and Nontraditional Nursing Roles in a Telemedicine Home Spirometry Monitoring Program
Abstract:
Traditional and Nontraditional Nursing Roles in a Telemedicine Home Spirometry Monitoring Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Harrington, Kathleen, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:Home Spirometry Program - 4-150 WDH, MMC 1331, 308 Harvard St S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Co-Authors:S.J. Pangarakis, R. Lindquist, and S.M. Finkelstein, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Background: Lung transplant recipients require close pulmonary monitoring due to the risk of infection or rejection. Electronic home spirometry has shown to be reliable and effective in monitoring pulmonary function. Regular adherence to the spirometry protocol is essential for successful early detection of infection or rejection episodes between office visits. Objective: To identify traditional and nontraditional nursing roles that positively influence subject adherence to home spirometry monitoring. Methods: Nurse researchers recruit lung transplant recipients to the home monitoring research program, instruct subjects on spirometer usage and data transmission, and provide routine technical and traditional nursing support. Nurses review transmitted spirometry tests and associated symptom data weekly to identify potential pulmonary problems and to monitor subject adherence. Traditional nursing strategies used to maintain adherence include regular phone calls, follow-up at clinic visits, and written correspondence through quarterly newsletters, graphic reports, and letters. Non-traditional nursing roles in a telemedicine program such as this require the nurse act as a liaison between the programs' technology manager, spirometer data center personnel and the participant in managing and troubleshooting technical issues and device problems. Results: In the first 22 weeks of the program 23 subjects have enrolled, 19 are using their spirometers regularly, 3 subjects are waiting to begin pending extenuating health issues, and one participant expired. During the most recent reporting week, 13 subjects (68%) transmitted data successfully. Technical difficulties that occurred (n=8) with the spirometer or with data transmission were resolved quickly. Subject adherence tended to fluctuate during this time but appeared to rebound as these issues were resolved. Conclusion: Subject confidence, satisfaction, and adherence to home monitoring are dependent on reliable, user-friendly devices, timely resolution of technical problems and on-going nursing support. The traditional and nontraditional roles of the project nurses are crucial elements in maintaining subject adherence and ensuring program success.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTraditional and Nontraditional Nursing Roles in a Telemedicine Home Spirometry Monitoring Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161008-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Traditional and Nontraditional Nursing Roles in a Telemedicine Home Spirometry Monitoring Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrington, Kathleen, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Home Spirometry Program - 4-150 WDH, MMC 1331, 308 Harvard St S.E., Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">macm0026@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.J. Pangarakis, R. Lindquist, and S.M. Finkelstein, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Lung transplant recipients require close pulmonary monitoring due to the risk of infection or rejection. Electronic home spirometry has shown to be reliable and effective in monitoring pulmonary function. Regular adherence to the spirometry protocol is essential for successful early detection of infection or rejection episodes between office visits. Objective: To identify traditional and nontraditional nursing roles that positively influence subject adherence to home spirometry monitoring. Methods: Nurse researchers recruit lung transplant recipients to the home monitoring research program, instruct subjects on spirometer usage and data transmission, and provide routine technical and traditional nursing support. Nurses review transmitted spirometry tests and associated symptom data weekly to identify potential pulmonary problems and to monitor subject adherence. Traditional nursing strategies used to maintain adherence include regular phone calls, follow-up at clinic visits, and written correspondence through quarterly newsletters, graphic reports, and letters. Non-traditional nursing roles in a telemedicine program such as this require the nurse act as a liaison between the programs' technology manager, spirometer data center personnel and the participant in managing and troubleshooting technical issues and device problems. Results: In the first 22 weeks of the program 23 subjects have enrolled, 19 are using their spirometers regularly, 3 subjects are waiting to begin pending extenuating health issues, and one participant expired. During the most recent reporting week, 13 subjects (68%) transmitted data successfully. Technical difficulties that occurred (n=8) with the spirometer or with data transmission were resolved quickly. Subject adherence tended to fluctuate during this time but appeared to rebound as these issues were resolved. Conclusion: Subject confidence, satisfaction, and adherence to home monitoring are dependent on reliable, user-friendly devices, timely resolution of technical problems and on-going nursing support. The traditional and nontraditional roles of the project nurses are crucial elements in maintaining subject adherence and ensuring program success.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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