2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161013
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Applying the Omaha System to Student Community Assessment: A Feasibility Test
Abstract:
Applying the Omaha System to Student Community Assessment: A Feasibility Test
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kerr, Madeleine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 308 Harvard St. Se, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Co-Authors:C. Garcia and B. Westra, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; K.A. Monsen and P. Galligher, Public Health & Environment, Washington County, Stillwater, MN; and K.S. Martin, , Martin Associates, Omaha, NE
Purpose: This study tests the feasibility of integrating a standardized nursing classification, the Omaha System, into student community assessments. Background: Community assessment, a core function of public health nursing, is a key component of undergraduate population-based nursing curricula. Students utilize the Community Assessment Instrument for Baccalaureate Learners (CAIBL) to assess a community's strengths and opportunities for improvement as part of the nursing process with a community. The Omaha System is a complex multiaxial hierarchical classification system, amenable to automation and implementation within public health informatics systems. A community-level modifier in the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme (PCS) allows for documentation of community level assessments, interventions and outcomes. Theoretical Framework: The nursing process in the context of an ecological framework provides the theoretical underpinnings for community assessment. Method: A sample of 6 archived student community assessments provided data in the form of narrative statements about community strengths and opportunities for improvement. An expert panel of 5 experienced Omaha System users independently applied the PCS to 73 narrative items (39 strengths, 34 opportunities for improvement). Resulting PCS problem and sign/symptom terms were compiled and agreement evaluated using a criterion of 80% or 4/5 panel members with the same PCS problem term. Results: Expert panelists found matches within the PCS for each of the students' narrative statements, and reached 80% agreement on PCS problems for 67% of the items. Agreement was greatest (74%) for opportunities for improvement compared to strengths (62%). Conclusion: It was feasible to map student community assessment statements to PCS terms, supporting use of Omaha System terms in conjunction with CAIBL for data standardization. Community-level strengths and opportunities for improvement were successfully identified and categorized using the PCS. The future public health nursing workforce can experience using standardized terminology in describing community assessments; the first step towards measuring community-level outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplying the Omaha System to Student Community Assessment: A Feasibility Testen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161013-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Applying the Omaha System to Student Community Assessment: A Feasibility Test</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerr, Madeleine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 308 Harvard St. Se, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kerrx010@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Garcia and B. Westra, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; K.A. Monsen and P. Galligher, Public Health &amp; Environment, Washington County, Stillwater, MN; and K.S. Martin, , Martin Associates, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study tests the feasibility of integrating a standardized nursing classification, the Omaha System, into student community assessments. Background: Community assessment, a core function of public health nursing, is a key component of undergraduate population-based nursing curricula. Students utilize the Community Assessment Instrument for Baccalaureate Learners (CAIBL) to assess a community's strengths and opportunities for improvement as part of the nursing process with a community. The Omaha System is a complex multiaxial hierarchical classification system, amenable to automation and implementation within public health informatics systems. A community-level modifier in the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme (PCS) allows for documentation of community level assessments, interventions and outcomes. Theoretical Framework: The nursing process in the context of an ecological framework provides the theoretical underpinnings for community assessment. Method: A sample of 6 archived student community assessments provided data in the form of narrative statements about community strengths and opportunities for improvement. An expert panel of 5 experienced Omaha System users independently applied the PCS to 73 narrative items (39 strengths, 34 opportunities for improvement). Resulting PCS problem and sign/symptom terms were compiled and agreement evaluated using a criterion of 80% or 4/5 panel members with the same PCS problem term. Results: Expert panelists found matches within the PCS for each of the students' narrative statements, and reached 80% agreement on PCS problems for 67% of the items. Agreement was greatest (74%) for opportunities for improvement compared to strengths (62%). Conclusion: It was feasible to map student community assessment statements to PCS terms, supporting use of Omaha System terms in conjunction with CAIBL for data standardization. Community-level strengths and opportunities for improvement were successfully identified and categorized using the PCS. The future public health nursing workforce can experience using standardized terminology in describing community assessments; the first step towards measuring community-level outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.