2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161014
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Stroke Caregiver Problem-Solving Intervention: Preliminary Outcomes
Abstract:
A Stroke Caregiver Problem-Solving Intervention: Preliminary Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:King, Rosemarie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Contact Address:Physical Med & Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA
Co-Authors:R.J. Hartke, Psychology, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; T.T. Houle, Anesthesiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC; B.S. Alexander, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Alexian Brothers Hospital Network , Ch
INTRODUCTION. The high levels of distress reported by stroke caregivers during early caregiving often continue through the chronic phase of care. The primary aim of this randomized trial was to test the efficacy of a stress management intervention on coping process variables (problem-solving, unmet resource needs), caregiver outcomes (depression, anxiety, caregiving preparedness, life changes) and stroke survivor function. The study was guided by the Moos and Schaefer model of coping with the crisis of physical illness. METHODS. Participants were randomized to a caregiver problem-solving intervention group (CPSI, n=22) or a wait-list control group (WLC, n=22). Data were collected at Time 1 (T1, acute rehabilitation) and Time 2 (T2) post-intervention/3 months postdischarge. Repeated measures ANOVA tests were used to examine differences over time and between groups. The majority of caregivers was White (80%), female (86%), and employed (54%). The mean ages were 57.4/SD=13.9 and 61.8/SD=14.4, respectively, for caregivers and survivors. RESULTS. T1 depressive symptoms were significantly greater in the CPSI than the WLC group (p <.01). Findings indicated greater improvement in several CPSI group outcomes compared with the WLC group. ANOVA indicated group X time interactions favoring the CPSI group for positive problem orientation, depression, preparedness, caregiver life change, and survivor function (p <.05). The main effect for time was significant for anxiety (p <.01) and negative problem orientation (p<.05), such that the CPSI group showed greater improvement at T2. Unmet resource needs decreased for both CPSI (p <.01) and WLC (p <.05) groups. Although improvement in impulsive problem-solving favored the WLC group (p <.05), they deteriorated in avoidance and rational problem-solving and positive orientation. The CPSI showed non-significant improvement in these scales. CONCLUSION. These findings provide preliminary support for the efficacy of an early stress management intervention to reduce caregiver distress. Participant enrollment and data collection are in progress; findings from a larger sample will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Stroke Caregiver Problem-Solving Intervention: Preliminary Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161014-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Stroke Caregiver Problem-Solving Intervention: Preliminary Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Rosemarie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Physical Med &amp; Rehabilitation, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbking@northwestern.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.J. Hartke, Psychology, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; T.T. Houle, Anesthesiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC; B.S. Alexander, Physical Medicine &amp; Rehabilitation, Alexian Brothers Hospital Network , Ch</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION. The high levels of distress reported by stroke caregivers during early caregiving often continue through the chronic phase of care. The primary aim of this randomized trial was to test the efficacy of a stress management intervention on coping process variables (problem-solving, unmet resource needs), caregiver outcomes (depression, anxiety, caregiving preparedness, life changes) and stroke survivor function. The study was guided by the Moos and Schaefer model of coping with the crisis of physical illness. METHODS. Participants were randomized to a caregiver problem-solving intervention group (CPSI, n=22) or a wait-list control group (WLC, n=22). Data were collected at Time 1 (T1, acute rehabilitation) and Time 2 (T2) post-intervention/3 months postdischarge. Repeated measures ANOVA tests were used to examine differences over time and between groups. The majority of caregivers was White (80%), female (86%), and employed (54%). The mean ages were 57.4/SD=13.9 and 61.8/SD=14.4, respectively, for caregivers and survivors. RESULTS. T1 depressive symptoms were significantly greater in the CPSI than the WLC group (p &lt;.01). Findings indicated greater improvement in several CPSI group outcomes compared with the WLC group. ANOVA indicated group X time interactions favoring the CPSI group for positive problem orientation, depression, preparedness, caregiver life change, and survivor function (p &lt;.05). The main effect for time was significant for anxiety (p &lt;.01) and negative problem orientation (p&lt;.05), such that the CPSI group showed greater improvement at T2. Unmet resource needs decreased for both CPSI (p &lt;.01) and WLC (p &lt;.05) groups. Although improvement in impulsive problem-solving favored the WLC group (p &lt;.05), they deteriorated in avoidance and rational problem-solving and positive orientation. The CPSI showed non-significant improvement in these scales. CONCLUSION. These findings provide preliminary support for the efficacy of an early stress management intervention to reduce caregiver distress. Participant enrollment and data collection are in progress; findings from a larger sample will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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