2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Qualitative Study of Amish Beliefs About Diabetes
Abstract:
A Qualitative Study of Amish Beliefs About Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Koehn, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wichita State University
Contact Address:Nursing - Box 41, Wichita, KS, 67260, USA
Co-Authors:B. Elder, Nursing, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS
The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to describe and understand how members of the Amish community in a rural midwestern setting view diabetes, its prevention, and treatment. The intent of this initial study was to focus on the community knowledge and concerns in order to design and plan a culturally sensitive educational intervention for diabetes. Huff and Kline's Cultural Assessment Framework guided the study. A purposive sample of eleven Amish men and women, between the ages of 51 and 78, participated. The participants represented three different groups within the Amish community, the "Old Order", & "New Order", and "Beachy." Data, consisting of interviews, field notes, and participant-identified reading materials, were analyzed per the constant comparative method. Contrary to findings in previous studies, these Amish participants did not expect or require variations in health care practices that are different from the mainstream American culture. In addition, these participants sought information from a variety of printed sources to manage and treat the disease, yet voiced limited knowledge of the causes and prevention of diabetes. Common themes included "following doctor's orders," "reading is a lifeline," "living without sweets," and "paying for health care." Two primary differences identified among the three Amish groups included "using herbal remedies" and "traveling to health care facilities." The results of this study suggest that written materials are an important avenue for providing diabetes education for this population. Recommendations for future study include investigating health care providers' educational approaches to the Amish community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Qualitative Study of Amish Beliefs About Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Qualitative Study of Amish Beliefs About Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koehn, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wichita State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing - Box 41, Wichita, KS, 67260, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mary.Koehn@wichita.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Elder, Nursing, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to describe and understand how members of the Amish community in a rural midwestern setting view diabetes, its prevention, and treatment. The intent of this initial study was to focus on the community knowledge and concerns in order to design and plan a culturally sensitive educational intervention for diabetes. Huff and Kline's Cultural Assessment Framework guided the study. A purposive sample of eleven Amish men and women, between the ages of 51 and 78, participated. The participants represented three different groups within the Amish community, the &quot;Old Order&quot;, &amp; &quot;New Order&quot;, and &quot;Beachy.&quot; Data, consisting of interviews, field notes, and participant-identified reading materials, were analyzed per the constant comparative method. Contrary to findings in previous studies, these Amish participants did not expect or require variations in health care practices that are different from the mainstream American culture. In addition, these participants sought information from a variety of printed sources to manage and treat the disease, yet voiced limited knowledge of the causes and prevention of diabetes. Common themes included &quot;following doctor's orders,&quot; &quot;reading is a lifeline,&quot; &quot;living without sweets,&quot; and &quot;paying for health care.&quot; Two primary differences identified among the three Amish groups included &quot;using herbal remedies&quot; and &quot;traveling to health care facilities.&quot; The results of this study suggest that written materials are an important avenue for providing diabetes education for this population. Recommendations for future study include investigating health care providers' educational approaches to the Amish community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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