Outcomes for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers Receiving a Telehealth Social Support Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161018
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers Receiving a Telehealth Social Support Intervention
Abstract:
Outcomes for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers Receiving a Telehealth Social Support Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:B.C. Yates, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
Objective: Spousal caregivers with major caregiving responsibilities for seriously chronically ill persons may neglect healthy lifestyle behaviors and be vulnerable for poor health outcomes. Caregivers are more stressed and have mortality risks 63% higher than for non-caregivers. Research with heart failure (HF) caregivers has assessed burden but hasn't evaluated interventions to diminish stress outcomes. The objective of this feasibility study was to examine the outcomes of an 8-week social support (SS) intervention on the health outcomes of stress, fatigue, and sleep in spousal caregivers of HF patients. Methods: A repeated measures design was used to examine patterns at baseline, 1, and 2 months. Participants were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The Health Buddy, a simple, user-friendly, 6 by 9 inch telecommunication device, was used to deliver the SS intervention. The intervention group accessed the Health Buddy daily for 10-15 minutes for information on HF, healthy lifestyle behaviors, emotional support, seeking SS, and conflict management. Stress and fatigue were measured using valid, reliable questionnaires. Sleep was measured with the Actiwatch L. Results: The 19 participants were 79% Caucasian and 84% women with a mean age of 64 years. In the control group, caregiver burden decreased (demand by 13%; difficulty 4%; average burden 9%), but not as much as for the intervention group (demand by 15%; difficulty 13%; average burden 15%). The intervention group started out less fatigued than the control group and generally reported a lower level of fatigue at subsequent time points. The control group was more fatigued at one month, but fatigue decreased to near baseline at 2 months. For the intervention group, total sleep time decreased by 40 minutes while number of wake bouts after sleep onset increased from 48 to 55; in the control group, sleep time increased by 10 minutes and number of wake bouts decreased by four. Sleep latency rose in the control group from 18 to 20 minutes and decreased in the intervention group from 28 to 15 minutes. Conclusion: Components of SS can be delivered via a telehealth communication device. Intervention participants diminished burden, maintained lower levels of fatigue and improved sleep latency.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers Receiving a Telehealth Social Support Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161018-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes for Heart Failure Spousal Caregivers Receiving a Telehealth Social Support Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaFramboise, Louise, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llaframb@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.C. Yates, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Spousal caregivers with major caregiving responsibilities for seriously chronically ill persons may neglect healthy lifestyle behaviors and be vulnerable for poor health outcomes. Caregivers are more stressed and have mortality risks 63% higher than for non-caregivers. Research with heart failure (HF) caregivers has assessed burden but hasn't evaluated interventions to diminish stress outcomes. The objective of this feasibility study was to examine the outcomes of an 8-week social support (SS) intervention on the health outcomes of stress, fatigue, and sleep in spousal caregivers of HF patients. Methods: A repeated measures design was used to examine patterns at baseline, 1, and 2 months. Participants were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The Health Buddy, a simple, user-friendly, 6 by 9 inch telecommunication device, was used to deliver the SS intervention. The intervention group accessed the Health Buddy daily for 10-15 minutes for information on HF, healthy lifestyle behaviors, emotional support, seeking SS, and conflict management. Stress and fatigue were measured using valid, reliable questionnaires. Sleep was measured with the Actiwatch L. Results: The 19 participants were 79% Caucasian and 84% women with a mean age of 64 years. In the control group, caregiver burden decreased (demand by 13%; difficulty 4%; average burden 9%), but not as much as for the intervention group (demand by 15%; difficulty 13%; average burden 15%). The intervention group started out less fatigued than the control group and generally reported a lower level of fatigue at subsequent time points. The control group was more fatigued at one month, but fatigue decreased to near baseline at 2 months. For the intervention group, total sleep time decreased by 40 minutes while number of wake bouts after sleep onset increased from 48 to 55; in the control group, sleep time increased by 10 minutes and number of wake bouts decreased by four. Sleep latency rose in the control group from 18 to 20 minutes and decreased in the intervention group from 28 to 15 minutes. Conclusion: Components of SS can be delivered via a telehealth communication device. Intervention participants diminished burden, maintained lower levels of fatigue and improved sleep latency.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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