2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161019
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cleanliness as Moral Discourse in Missionary Nurses' Writings
Abstract:
Cleanliness as Moral Discourse in Missionary Nurses' Writings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lagerwey, Mary, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Western Michigan University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA
Since its earliest days of professional practice, nursing has emphasized sanitation as central to controlling infection and limiting contagion. Cleanliness has, however, also been appropriated by moral discourses having little to do with physical health. This study examined denominational publications, annual reports, institutional records, and private correspondence of missionary nurses who practiced in New Mexico among the Navajo at the Rehoboth Mission in the first half of the twentieth century. All references to the presence or lack of cleanliness, hygiene, and sanitation were identified. Using discourse analysis, these textual excerpts and their contexts were studied. Four moral discourses were found: virtue, redemption, Anglo superiority, and compassion. Silences regarding Navajo history and experiences were identified. The paper concludes with a discussion of the power of discourses to define, distance, and silence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCleanliness as Moral Discourse in Missionary Nurses' Writingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161019-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cleanliness as Moral Discourse in Missionary Nurses' Writings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lagerwey, Mary, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.lagerwey@wmich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Since its earliest days of professional practice, nursing has emphasized sanitation as central to controlling infection and limiting contagion. Cleanliness has, however, also been appropriated by moral discourses having little to do with physical health. This study examined denominational publications, annual reports, institutional records, and private correspondence of missionary nurses who practiced in New Mexico among the Navajo at the Rehoboth Mission in the first half of the twentieth century. All references to the presence or lack of cleanliness, hygiene, and sanitation were identified. Using discourse analysis, these textual excerpts and their contexts were studied. Four moral discourses were found: virtue, redemption, Anglo superiority, and compassion. Silences regarding Navajo history and experiences were identified. The paper concludes with a discussion of the power of discourses to define, distance, and silence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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