The Mediating Effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs on Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications for Women With HIV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161022
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Mediating Effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs on Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications for Women With HIV
Abstract:
The Mediating Effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs on Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications for Women With HIV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lehman Trzynka, Sue, RN, MSN. PhD candidate
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, De Kalb, IL, 60115-6568, USA
Co-Authors:J.A. Erlen, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh , Pittsburgh, PA
Purpose: This study examined the potential mediating effect of self-efficacy beliefs on the relationships between depressive symptomatology and self-reported adherence to antiretroviral medications for women with HIV. Sample and Setting: The convenience sample consisted of 44 HIV positive women; 20% of the women were age 50 or older (M=42.9). The white subjects (55%) were women living in rural areas of western Pennsylvania. Approximately 80% of the women had a high school education or its equivalent. Twenty-eight of the women reported that they received disability income. Eighty percent accessed care and medications through Medicare or Medicaid. Methods: The measures included the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale (Erlen, 1999), the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Adherence Assessment and a demographic form. Results: Depressive symptomatology was quite high (M=22.42). Self-efficacy beliefs was (M=151.43) Seventy-seven percent of the women reported not missing any of their antiretroviral medications in the last 4 days; 59% reported taking their medications according to special instructions. Regression analysis showed that self-efficacy beliefs mediated the relationship between depressive symptomatology and self-reported adherence (Beta =.302. R2 =.165, p =.046). Conclusion: Despite the presence of moderately severe depressive symptomatology improved self-efficacy beliefs influence one's adherence behaviors to antiretroviral medications. Depressive symptomatology remains a major issue for women with HIV and interventions directed at adherence may need to include attention to depressive symptoms as well as self-efficacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Mediating Effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs on Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications for Women With HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161022-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Mediating Effect of Self-efficacy Beliefs on Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications for Women With HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lehman Trzynka, Sue, RN, MSN. PhD candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, De Kalb, IL, 60115-6568, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">strzynka@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.A. Erlen, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh , Pittsburgh, PA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined the potential mediating effect of self-efficacy beliefs on the relationships between depressive symptomatology and self-reported adherence to antiretroviral medications for women with HIV. Sample and Setting: The convenience sample consisted of 44 HIV positive women; 20% of the women were age 50 or older (M=42.9). The white subjects (55%) were women living in rural areas of western Pennsylvania. Approximately 80% of the women had a high school education or its equivalent. Twenty-eight of the women reported that they received disability income. Eighty percent accessed care and medications through Medicare or Medicaid. Methods: The measures included the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale (Erlen, 1999), the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Adherence Assessment and a demographic form. Results: Depressive symptomatology was quite high (M=22.42). Self-efficacy beliefs was (M=151.43) Seventy-seven percent of the women reported not missing any of their antiretroviral medications in the last 4 days; 59% reported taking their medications according to special instructions. Regression analysis showed that self-efficacy beliefs mediated the relationship between depressive symptomatology and self-reported adherence (Beta =.302. R2 =.165, p =.046). Conclusion: Despite the presence of moderately severe depressive symptomatology improved self-efficacy beliefs influence one's adherence behaviors to antiretroviral medications. Depressive symptomatology remains a major issue for women with HIV and interventions directed at adherence may need to include attention to depressive symptoms as well as self-efficacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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