2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Difficulties After Hospitalization
Abstract:
Coping Difficulties After Hospitalization
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Miller, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Contact Address:Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Co-Authors:L.B. Piacentine and M.E. Weiss, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
Little is known about patients' stressors during the initial weeks after hospital discharge in this era of shortened lengths of hospital stay. Patients' perspectives on care demands during the immediate weeks after hospital discharge need to be discovered so nurses can anticipate their needs and prepare patients to confront potential challenges when alone at home. Patient-centeredness provided the framework for this study. Coping difficulties of 113 adults three weeks after discharge from the hospital for medical surgical conditions were analyzed using the Post Discharge Coping Difficulties Scale (Weiss, 2006) and a brief focused telephone interview (14 item guide). Specific stressors/difficulties related to recovery, self-care, and needs for ongoing assistance from family and/or health care professionals were probed. A subset analysis of 29 persons living alone was also completed. This research is a component of a larger study of 423 patients by Weiss (2006) on readiness for hospital discharge. The mean coping difficulties score of 24.1 (SD 18.2), possible range 0 - 80, indicates moderately low coping difficulties with a large variance in scores. Themes for each of the 14 areas of post discharge difficulty/need were identified. For example for "What is stressful," 18 categories of stressors were discovered with the five most frequently reported stressor categories labeled: work issues; pain management; lack of personal sense of normalcy; recovery challenges (unfamiliar symptoms); medical follow-up/readmission for complications; and family issue. Themes for each of the following areas of coping were also identified: recovery; caring for self; managing the medical condition; and family members' needs. Data were collected on what advice/support was needed; reasons to contact health professionals; readmissions; and based on what you know now; what information would you liked to have had prior to discharge. Results will guide nurses in preparing patients for self-management after hospital discharge by reviewing with them what to expect in the process of recovery and addressing each of the prevalent coping challenges uncovered. Managing discomfort, reconstructing one's disrupted biography, and planning to resume life roles should be included.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Difficulties After Hospitalizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Difficulties After Hospitalization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">judith.miller@mu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.B. Piacentine and M.E. Weiss, Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about patients' stressors during the initial weeks after hospital discharge in this era of shortened lengths of hospital stay. Patients' perspectives on care demands during the immediate weeks after hospital discharge need to be discovered so nurses can anticipate their needs and prepare patients to confront potential challenges when alone at home. Patient-centeredness provided the framework for this study. Coping difficulties of 113 adults three weeks after discharge from the hospital for medical surgical conditions were analyzed using the Post Discharge Coping Difficulties Scale (Weiss, 2006) and a brief focused telephone interview (14 item guide). Specific stressors/difficulties related to recovery, self-care, and needs for ongoing assistance from family and/or health care professionals were probed. A subset analysis of 29 persons living alone was also completed. This research is a component of a larger study of 423 patients by Weiss (2006) on readiness for hospital discharge. The mean coping difficulties score of 24.1 (SD 18.2), possible range 0 - 80, indicates moderately low coping difficulties with a large variance in scores. Themes for each of the 14 areas of post discharge difficulty/need were identified. For example for &quot;What is stressful,&quot; 18 categories of stressors were discovered with the five most frequently reported stressor categories labeled: work issues; pain management; lack of personal sense of normalcy; recovery challenges (unfamiliar symptoms); medical follow-up/readmission for complications; and family issue. Themes for each of the following areas of coping were also identified: recovery; caring for self; managing the medical condition; and family members' needs. Data were collected on what advice/support was needed; reasons to contact health professionals; readmissions; and based on what you know now; what information would you liked to have had prior to discharge. Results will guide nurses in preparing patients for self-management after hospital discharge by reviewing with them what to expect in the process of recovery and addressing each of the prevalent coping challenges uncovered. Managing discomfort, reconstructing one's disrupted biography, and planning to resume life roles should be included.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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