Giving Voice: Post-Treatment Quality of Life in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161029
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Giving Voice: Post-Treatment Quality of Life in African American Breast Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Giving Voice: Post-Treatment Quality of Life in African American Breast Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mills-Wisneski, Sharon, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Suite 4320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Co-Authors:B. Cimprich, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Little is known about the impact of breast cancer in African American breast cancer survivors post-treatment. During the extended phase of survivorship, African American women have unique challenges and concerns that may arise after completion of treatment. Purpose: To examine the Quality of life (QOL) in African American breast cancer survivors using Mullen's (1985) concept of survivorship. Specifically, this study examined the positive and negative psychological aspect of African American breast cancer survivors' subjective quality of life, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Conceptual Model: Mullen's (1985) concept of survivorship was used for describing issues and concerns unique to African American breast cancer survivors in the extended phase of survivorship following completion of treatment. Methods: The study design involved two phases consisting of a mailed survey to 100 African American breast cancer survivors at 2 to 10 years post treatment and a structured interview. Only the survey results will be reported here. The participants consisted of members from the Sisters Network, Inc. Michigan chapters, Sisters Network chapters from surrounding states, and the University of Michigan's Women's Health Registry. The mailed survey included three measures: The Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) survey, the Breast Cancer Service Needs Instrument, and the Demographic Data sheet. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe African American breast cancer survivors' physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being post-treatment. Results: Research study is currently in progress. Implications: This study has provided a mechanism for African American breast cancer survivors to give voice to their needs and concerns after treatment. The findings of this study will provide new information about breast cancer experience and related service needs of African American women. Overall, the findings will provide a foundation for targeted interventions to improve quality of life for African American breast cancer survivors in the extended phase of survivorship. Keywords: Cancer survivorship, Minority health, and Women's health
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGiving Voice: Post-Treatment Quality of Life in African American Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161029-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Giving Voice: Post-Treatment Quality of Life in African American Breast Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mills-Wisneski, Sharon, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Suite 4320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drwhiz@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Cimprich, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about the impact of breast cancer in African American breast cancer survivors post-treatment. During the extended phase of survivorship, African American women have unique challenges and concerns that may arise after completion of treatment. Purpose: To examine the Quality of life (QOL) in African American breast cancer survivors using Mullen's (1985) concept of survivorship. Specifically, this study examined the positive and negative psychological aspect of African American breast cancer survivors' subjective quality of life, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Conceptual Model: Mullen's (1985) concept of survivorship was used for describing issues and concerns unique to African American breast cancer survivors in the extended phase of survivorship following completion of treatment. Methods: The study design involved two phases consisting of a mailed survey to 100 African American breast cancer survivors at 2 to 10 years post treatment and a structured interview. Only the survey results will be reported here. The participants consisted of members from the Sisters Network, Inc. Michigan chapters, Sisters Network chapters from surrounding states, and the University of Michigan's Women's Health Registry. The mailed survey included three measures: The Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) survey, the Breast Cancer Service Needs Instrument, and the Demographic Data sheet. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe African American breast cancer survivors' physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being post-treatment. Results: Research study is currently in progress. Implications: This study has provided a mechanism for African American breast cancer survivors to give voice to their needs and concerns after treatment. The findings of this study will provide new information about breast cancer experience and related service needs of African American women. Overall, the findings will provide a foundation for targeted interventions to improve quality of life for African American breast cancer survivors in the extended phase of survivorship. Keywords: Cancer survivorship, Minority health, and Women's health</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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