The First Anniversary: Spousal Bereavement-Related Stress, Coping, and Well-Being in Older Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161030
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The First Anniversary: Spousal Bereavement-Related Stress, Coping, and Well-Being in Older Women
Abstract:
The First Anniversary: Spousal Bereavement-Related Stress, Coping, and Well-Being in Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Minton, Mary, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5018 Carriage Hills Drive, Rapid City, SD, 57702, USA
Co-Authors:C.R. Barron and M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
Problem: By 2020 approximately one million individuals will experience spousal bereavement annually, primarily affecting older women. However, little is known about the survivor's well-being around the first year death anniversary. This study examined spousal bereavement-related stress, coping, and well-being in widows 65 years and older at months 11, 12, and 13 following the death of the spouse and is based on Lazarus and Folkman's transactional approach and Schaefer and Moos' model of life crises and transitions. Method/Design: Using a prospective, longitudinal, correlational design, data were collected from 47 widows 65 years and older at months 11, 12, and 13 following the death of the spouse. Concepts and related variables measured were: personal resource (optimism); environmental resource (social network); bereavement-related physiological (salivary cortisol) and psychological (intrusion-avoidance) stress; coping (spiritual, social support); and well-being (spiritual, psychosocial, and physical). The average participant was 74 years old (range = 65 to 91), Caucasian (100%), and married an average of 46 years (range 3-64 years). The death of the spouse represented the end of a first marriage (76.6%). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and repeated measures ANOVA with planned comparisons. Results indicated that, at all three time periods, optimism was: a) inversely correlated with intrusion-avoidance (r = -.52 to -.66, p < .01), and b) positively correlated with psychosocial well-being (r = .58 to .72, p < .01) and spiritual well-being (r =.50 to .69, p < .01). Moreover, at all three time periods, social network was positively correlated with social support coping (r =.46 to .56, p < .01) and spiritual coping was positively correlated with spiritual well-being (r = .47 to .60, p < .01). As expected, psychological stress as measured by the Impact of Event Scale (intrusion-avoidance) was higher at month 12 when compared to month 13 (t (43) = 2.54, p =.007) but not when compared to month 11 (t(43) = 1.49, p =.072). Results will aid in developing interventions to strengthen survivor's coping strategies during the first anniversary.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe First Anniversary: Spousal Bereavement-Related Stress, Coping, and Well-Being in Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161030-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The First Anniversary: Spousal Bereavement-Related Stress, Coping, and Well-Being in Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Minton, Mary, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5018 Carriage Hills Drive, Rapid City, SD, 57702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maryminton6@aim.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.R. Barron and M. Hertzog, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: By 2020 approximately one million individuals will experience spousal bereavement annually, primarily affecting older women. However, little is known about the survivor's well-being around the first year death anniversary. This study examined spousal bereavement-related stress, coping, and well-being in widows 65 years and older at months 11, 12, and 13 following the death of the spouse and is based on Lazarus and Folkman's transactional approach and Schaefer and Moos' model of life crises and transitions. Method/Design: Using a prospective, longitudinal, correlational design, data were collected from 47 widows 65 years and older at months 11, 12, and 13 following the death of the spouse. Concepts and related variables measured were: personal resource (optimism); environmental resource (social network); bereavement-related physiological (salivary cortisol) and psychological (intrusion-avoidance) stress; coping (spiritual, social support); and well-being (spiritual, psychosocial, and physical). The average participant was 74 years old (range = 65 to 91), Caucasian (100%), and married an average of 46 years (range 3-64 years). The death of the spouse represented the end of a first marriage (76.6%). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and repeated measures ANOVA with planned comparisons. Results indicated that, at all three time periods, optimism was: a) inversely correlated with intrusion-avoidance (r = -.52 to -.66, p &lt; .01), and b) positively correlated with psychosocial well-being (r = .58 to .72, p &lt; .01) and spiritual well-being (r =.50 to .69, p &lt; .01). Moreover, at all three time periods, social network was positively correlated with social support coping (r =.46 to .56, p &lt; .01) and spiritual coping was positively correlated with spiritual well-being (r = .47 to .60, p &lt; .01). As expected, psychological stress as measured by the Impact of Event Scale (intrusion-avoidance) was higher at month 12 when compared to month 13 (t (43) = 2.54, p =.007) but not when compared to month 11 (t(43) = 1.49, p =.072). Results will aid in developing interventions to strengthen survivor's coping strategies during the first anniversary.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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