Applying a Feminist Approach to Research With Female Domestic Workers in Malawi: The Joys and Challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161031
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Applying a Feminist Approach to Research With Female Domestic Workers in Malawi: The Joys and Challenges
Abstract:
Applying a Feminist Approach to Research With Female Domestic Workers in Malawi: The Joys and Challenges
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:CON - Cunningham Hall, Room 695, Milwaukee, WI, WI 53201, USA
Co-Authors:R. Rodriguez and N. Keiko, UNIDOS Against Domestic Violence, Madison, WI
Feminist theory is increasingly being seen as a valuable method for conducting research on issues related to nursing. A central tenet of the feminist approach is that men, as a social group, have power over women and that they also have greater access to important resources than women (Yllo & Bograd, 1990). In poor countries, limited resources for women and inability to access the few available resources due to gender imbalances pose significant risk to women's health. This report will focus on how feminist theory informed data collection, analysis and the implications for nursing practice and research. This qualitative study conducted in the city of Blantyre in Malawi, Southeast Africa sought to understand the experiences of violence among female domestic workers. Six focus group and ten individual interviews were conducted. A semi-structured interview guide was used for the interviews. A total of 48 women participated. In using a feminist framework, the researcher values reflexivity (McDowell, 1992) by acknowledging his or her values and biases in conducting research (Yllo & Bograd, 1990). In practicing reflexivity for this study, it was determined that the power relations existing between a researcher and a participant creates challenges that could have implications on informed consent. The question of whether the participants clearly understood what their rights were and believed that they had rights in a world where their rights are often not respected is a clear example. The exchange of ideas that took place between the researchers and the participants as well as among the participants themselves, for the greater benefit of women's health, was a positive accomplishment of this study. Data analysis employing a feminist framework also led to findings that emphasized women's strengths and their capacity to survive and adapt to their experiences of violence in an environment of limited resources and services available to help them cope. This study has implications on the nursing profession in that it provides information that may help nurses to not only understand the violence that young female domestic workers in Malawi face but also assist young women in resource-poor settings through the process of surviving the everyday hardships they endure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplying a Feminist Approach to Research With Female Domestic Workers in Malawi: The Joys and Challengesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161031-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Applying a Feminist Approach to Research With Female Domestic Workers in Malawi: The Joys and Challenges</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Cunningham Hall, Room 695, Milwaukee, WI, WI 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkandawi@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Rodriguez and N. Keiko, UNIDOS Against Domestic Violence, Madison, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Feminist theory is increasingly being seen as a valuable method for conducting research on issues related to nursing. A central tenet of the feminist approach is that men, as a social group, have power over women and that they also have greater access to important resources than women (Yllo &amp; Bograd, 1990). In poor countries, limited resources for women and inability to access the few available resources due to gender imbalances pose significant risk to women's health. This report will focus on how feminist theory informed data collection, analysis and the implications for nursing practice and research. This qualitative study conducted in the city of Blantyre in Malawi, Southeast Africa sought to understand the experiences of violence among female domestic workers. Six focus group and ten individual interviews were conducted. A semi-structured interview guide was used for the interviews. A total of 48 women participated. In using a feminist framework, the researcher values reflexivity (McDowell, 1992) by acknowledging his or her values and biases in conducting research (Yllo &amp; Bograd, 1990). In practicing reflexivity for this study, it was determined that the power relations existing between a researcher and a participant creates challenges that could have implications on informed consent. The question of whether the participants clearly understood what their rights were and believed that they had rights in a world where their rights are often not respected is a clear example. The exchange of ideas that took place between the researchers and the participants as well as among the participants themselves, for the greater benefit of women's health, was a positive accomplishment of this study. Data analysis employing a feminist framework also led to findings that emphasized women's strengths and their capacity to survive and adapt to their experiences of violence in an environment of limited resources and services available to help them cope. This study has implications on the nursing profession in that it provides information that may help nurses to not only understand the violence that young female domestic workers in Malawi face but also assist young women in resource-poor settings through the process of surviving the everyday hardships they endure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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