Knowledge, Perception of Symptoms Seriousness, Treatment-Seeking Behavior, Time-to-Treatment and Psychological Distress in Women With First Time Heart Attack

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge, Perception of Symptoms Seriousness, Treatment-Seeking Behavior, Time-to-Treatment and Psychological Distress in Women With First Time Heart Attack
Abstract:
Knowledge, Perception of Symptoms Seriousness, Treatment-Seeking Behavior, Time-to-Treatment and Psychological Distress in Women With First Time Heart Attack
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mohamed, Hanem, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:F.A. Gary, D.L. Morris, and M. Lotas, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; M. Carlson, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; and H. Yarandi, School of Nursing, Wayne Universi
Background: Heart attack is the main cause of death among women in the Unites States. Women are unaware of risk factors and symptoms and perceive symptoms as less serious than they are. As a result, they engage in other treatment-seeking behavior prior to accessing medical care, which may lead to poor outcomes. Purpose: Examine women's knowledge of heart attacks risk factors and symptoms, and to examine which independent variable predicts psychological distress in women with first time heart attack. Methods: A correlational, cross-sectional design with a convenience samples of 46 women were interviewed face to face within 2 -5 days after admission and after they were physiologically stable. Results: Mean age was 59.5 (16) years, the median delay time was 3 hours. Seventeen percent of participants showed good knowledge of heart attack risk factors and 13% had good knowledge of symptoms. There was a significant negative correlation between perception of symptoms seriousness and treatment-seeking behavior (r =-.35, p=.01), time-to-treatment (r = -.38, p =.01), and positive but not significance correlation with knowledge of heart attack symptoms (r = .25, p =.09). Multiple regression indicates that treatment-seeking behavior explained 24%, knowledge of symptoms explained 23%, perception of symptom seriousness explained 17% and time-to-treatment explained 13% of variance of the outcome variable psychological distress. There was no significant relationship between the independent variables and psychological distress. Conclusion: Study findings will help health care providers to develop interventions to improve women's knowledge, and treatment-seeking behavior. Further studies should include larger samples and other predictor variables.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge, Perception of Symptoms Seriousness, Treatment-Seeking Behavior, Time-to-Treatment and Psychological Distress in Women With First Time Heart Attacken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge, Perception of Symptoms Seriousness, Treatment-Seeking Behavior, Time-to-Treatment and Psychological Distress in Women With First Time Heart Attack</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mohamed, Hanem, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fhm5@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">F.A. Gary, D.L. Morris, and M. Lotas, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; M. Carlson, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; and H. Yarandi, School of Nursing, Wayne Universi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Heart attack is the main cause of death among women in the Unites States. Women are unaware of risk factors and symptoms and perceive symptoms as less serious than they are. As a result, they engage in other treatment-seeking behavior prior to accessing medical care, which may lead to poor outcomes. Purpose: Examine women's knowledge of heart attacks risk factors and symptoms, and to examine which independent variable predicts psychological distress in women with first time heart attack. Methods: A correlational, cross-sectional design with a convenience samples of 46 women were interviewed face to face within 2 -5 days after admission and after they were physiologically stable. Results: Mean age was 59.5 (16) years, the median delay time was 3 hours. Seventeen percent of participants showed good knowledge of heart attack risk factors and 13% had good knowledge of symptoms. There was a significant negative correlation between perception of symptoms seriousness and treatment-seeking behavior (r =-.35, p=.01), time-to-treatment (r = -.38, p =.01), and positive but not significance correlation with knowledge of heart attack symptoms (r = .25, p =.09). Multiple regression indicates that treatment-seeking behavior explained 24%, knowledge of symptoms explained 23%, perception of symptom seriousness explained 17% and time-to-treatment explained 13% of variance of the outcome variable psychological distress. There was no significant relationship between the independent variables and psychological distress. Conclusion: Study findings will help health care providers to develop interventions to improve women's knowledge, and treatment-seeking behavior. Further studies should include larger samples and other predictor variables.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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