Stressors as Perceived by Egyptian Patients With Myocardial Infarction at Admission and Upon Discharge

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161033
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stressors as Perceived by Egyptian Patients With Myocardial Infarction at Admission and Upon Discharge
Abstract:
Stressors as Perceived by Egyptian Patients With Myocardial Infarction at Admission and Upon Discharge
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mohamed, Hanem, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:S.M. Alaa El-Din, Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University, Alexandria, EGYPT; S. Hamouda, Faculty of Nursing, Tanta University, Tanta, EGYPT; N.A. Shabaan, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, EGYPT; and F.A. Gary, Frances Payne Bolton School o
Background: Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Egypt. Patients admitted to Coronary Care Units (CCU) experience many stressors that negatively affect their outcomes. Purpose: Describe stressors as perceived by patients with first time acute myocardial infarction who were admitted to CCU in the acute stage of illness and upon discharge. Methods: At a university hospital in Egypt, a sample of 100 of patients was interviewed once after they were physiologically stable and one day before discharge. Results: The patients perceived environmental and physiological stressors as the major stressors in the acute stage, but by discharge the perceived stressors had decreased. However, social and psychological stressors remained high in the acute stage and upon discharge. There were significant relationships between environmental (t= 4.52, p= .001) and physiological stressors (t= 31.88, p=.001) in the acute stage and upon discharge. Physiological, social and psychological stressors were significant when examining the variables of gender, age, marital status, education, occupation and residence. Females, across the adult life span, who were married, urban dwellers, and not working were more stressed by environmental, social and psychological stressors in both acute and discharge stages. On the other hand, males (> 45), married, educated and urban dwellers were more stressed by social and psychological stressors only upon discharge. Conclusion: Implications for education, practice, research and health policy were articulated. Developing strategies to reduce patient's stressors may contribute to better outcomes and a healthier nation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStressors as Perceived by Egyptian Patients With Myocardial Infarction at Admission and Upon Dischargeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161033-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stressors as Perceived by Egyptian Patients With Myocardial Infarction at Admission and Upon Discharge</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mohamed, Hanem, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fhm5@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. Alaa El-Din, Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University, Alexandria, EGYPT; S. Hamouda, Faculty of Nursing, Tanta University, Tanta, EGYPT; N.A. Shabaan, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, EGYPT; and F.A. Gary, Frances Payne Bolton School o</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Egypt. Patients admitted to Coronary Care Units (CCU) experience many stressors that negatively affect their outcomes. Purpose: Describe stressors as perceived by patients with first time acute myocardial infarction who were admitted to CCU in the acute stage of illness and upon discharge. Methods: At a university hospital in Egypt, a sample of 100 of patients was interviewed once after they were physiologically stable and one day before discharge. Results: The patients perceived environmental and physiological stressors as the major stressors in the acute stage, but by discharge the perceived stressors had decreased. However, social and psychological stressors remained high in the acute stage and upon discharge. There were significant relationships between environmental (t= 4.52, p= .001) and physiological stressors (t= 31.88, p=.001) in the acute stage and upon discharge. Physiological, social and psychological stressors were significant when examining the variables of gender, age, marital status, education, occupation and residence. Females, across the adult life span, who were married, urban dwellers, and not working were more stressed by environmental, social and psychological stressors in both acute and discharge stages. On the other hand, males (&gt; 45), married, educated and urban dwellers were more stressed by social and psychological stressors only upon discharge. Conclusion: Implications for education, practice, research and health policy were articulated. Developing strategies to reduce patient's stressors may contribute to better outcomes and a healthier nation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.