Effects of a Telehealth Intervention on Recovery Outcomes Over the First Three Months After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161035
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Telehealth Intervention on Recovery Outcomes Over the First Three Months After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Abstract:
Effects of a Telehealth Intervention on Recovery Outcomes Over the First Three Months After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Nieveen, Janet, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Crete, NE, 68333, USA
Co-Authors:S. Barnason, L. Zimmerman, P. Schulz, M. Hertzog, C. Miller, and D. Rasmussen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE
Effective methods of recovery management and risk factor reduction need to be identified for cardiac patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of a telehealth home communication recovery management intervention (HCRMI) on the outcomes of self efficacy, physical functioning, physical activity, and exercise, over the first 3 months after PCI. The HCRMI content consisted of daily tailored messages that assessed and delivered information and education to subjects in their homes. The HCRMI was delivered via a telehealth format, the Health Buddy(c), a device placed in subjects' homes to deliver the intervention (through daily sessions) for 3 weeks. Data were collected at baseline (prior to hospital discharge), and through follow-up phone calls at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months. The sample consisted of 56 subjects randomly assigned to the HCRMI group or the usual care control group (28 per group). T-tests at each time point were used to examine differences between groups. Self efficacy (Barnason Efficacy Expectations Scale) was significantly higher in the intervention group at all follow-up time points (3 week, 6 week, and 3 month, p<.05). Physical functioning (MOS SF-36 Physical subscale) was higher in the intervention group at all follow-up time points, with statistical significance noted only at 6 weeks (p<.05). Physical activity (mailed 3-day Activity/Exercise Diary kept by subjects at each follow-up time point) was calculated as mean kcals/kg/day expended. Physical activity levels were not significantly different at any of the follow-up points, but were consistently higher over time in the intervention group. Mean daily minutes spent in exercise (calculated from self-report recording on the Diary) was higher in the intervention group at all time points, with significance found at 3 months (p<.05). These pilot results suggest that a tailored recovery intervention such as this, with delivery via a telehealth format may be useful to improve these recovery outcomes after PCI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Telehealth Intervention on Recovery Outcomes Over the First Three Months After Percutaneous Coronary Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161035-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a Telehealth Intervention on Recovery Outcomes Over the First Three Months After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nieveen, Janet, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Crete, NE, 68333, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlnievee@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Barnason, L. Zimmerman, P. Schulz, M. Hertzog, C. Miller, and D. Rasmussen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Effective methods of recovery management and risk factor reduction need to be identified for cardiac patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The purpose of this pilot study was to test the impact of a telehealth home communication recovery management intervention (HCRMI) on the outcomes of self efficacy, physical functioning, physical activity, and exercise, over the first 3 months after PCI. The HCRMI content consisted of daily tailored messages that assessed and delivered information and education to subjects in their homes. The HCRMI was delivered via a telehealth format, the Health Buddy(c), a device placed in subjects' homes to deliver the intervention (through daily sessions) for 3 weeks. Data were collected at baseline (prior to hospital discharge), and through follow-up phone calls at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months. The sample consisted of 56 subjects randomly assigned to the HCRMI group or the usual care control group (28 per group). T-tests at each time point were used to examine differences between groups. Self efficacy (Barnason Efficacy Expectations Scale) was significantly higher in the intervention group at all follow-up time points (3 week, 6 week, and 3 month, p&lt;.05). Physical functioning (MOS SF-36 Physical subscale) was higher in the intervention group at all follow-up time points, with statistical significance noted only at 6 weeks (p&lt;.05). Physical activity (mailed 3-day Activity/Exercise Diary kept by subjects at each follow-up time point) was calculated as mean kcals/kg/day expended. Physical activity levels were not significantly different at any of the follow-up points, but were consistently higher over time in the intervention group. Mean daily minutes spent in exercise (calculated from self-report recording on the Diary) was higher in the intervention group at all time points, with significance found at 3 months (p&lt;.05). These pilot results suggest that a tailored recovery intervention such as this, with delivery via a telehealth format may be useful to improve these recovery outcomes after PCI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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