2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161036
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Knowledge and Activities in Case Management Practice
Abstract:
A Comparison of Knowledge and Activities in Case Management Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Park, Eun Jun
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Contact Address:, Iowa city, IA, 52246, USA
Case management (CM) is a widely accepted healthcare practice, yet little is known about CM role performance. The purpose of this study is to compare CM activities/knowledge elements by professional discipline and by work setting. The method was a secondary analysis of a pre-collected dataset from an online practice survey done by the Commission for Case Manager Certification in 2004. The modified Getzels and Guba's model of role theory guides this study. The sample for this study was 4,421 CMs who spent 50% or more of their time in direct CM. They rated both frequency and importance of 103 activities (8 domains) and importance of 64 knowledge statements (6 domains). Subsamples from nursing, rehabilitation counseling, and social work (SW); and 7 work settings were analyzed. A decision tree was developed to identify specific and generic activities/knowledge elements. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA with the Scheffe test, the chi 2 test, the Pearson's rs, and the kappa statistic were performed as appropriate. A demographic profile of the CM workforce resulted from analysis and showed that the majority of CMs are RNs, work settings were diverse, and caseloads were highly variable. Analyses in this study identified specific, generic, and basic CM activities/knowledge domains per discipline and per work setting. For the importance of CM activities, there were 15-43 specific activities (e.g., MIRs greater than or equal to 3.00 & higher to a certain group in statistical analysis), 17 generic activities, and 2~18 basic activities depending on discipline. The same analyses were performed for frequency of activities and importance of 64 knowledge statements. Nursing and SW showed a relatively similar pattern in CM practice. By setting, it was similar between hospitals and rehabilitation facilities; between health insurance companies and managed care organizations; and among CM companies, Workers' Compensation Agencies, and third party administrators. These findings can help make evidence-based decisions about CM workforce management, help develop CM programs consistent with both organizational characteristics and strengths of the nursing profession, help standardize CM practice and education programs, and inform decisions about excluding non-essential activities/knowledge areas.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Knowledge and Activities in Case Management Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161036-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Knowledge and Activities in Case Management Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Eun Jun</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Iowa city, IA, 52246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eunjun-park@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Case management (CM) is a widely accepted healthcare practice, yet little is known about CM role performance. The purpose of this study is to compare CM activities/knowledge elements by professional discipline and by work setting. The method was a secondary analysis of a pre-collected dataset from an online practice survey done by the Commission for Case Manager Certification in 2004. The modified Getzels and Guba's model of role theory guides this study. The sample for this study was 4,421 CMs who spent 50% or more of their time in direct CM. They rated both frequency and importance of 103 activities (8 domains) and importance of 64 knowledge statements (6 domains). Subsamples from nursing, rehabilitation counseling, and social work (SW); and 7 work settings were analyzed. A decision tree was developed to identify specific and generic activities/knowledge elements. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA with the Scheffe test, the chi 2 test, the Pearson's rs, and the kappa statistic were performed as appropriate. A demographic profile of the CM workforce resulted from analysis and showed that the majority of CMs are RNs, work settings were diverse, and caseloads were highly variable. Analyses in this study identified specific, generic, and basic CM activities/knowledge domains per discipline and per work setting. For the importance of CM activities, there were 15-43 specific activities (e.g., MIRs greater than or equal to 3.00 &amp; higher to a certain group in statistical analysis), 17 generic activities, and 2~18 basic activities depending on discipline. The same analyses were performed for frequency of activities and importance of 64 knowledge statements. Nursing and SW showed a relatively similar pattern in CM practice. By setting, it was similar between hospitals and rehabilitation facilities; between health insurance companies and managed care organizations; and among CM companies, Workers' Compensation Agencies, and third party administrators. These findings can help make evidence-based decisions about CM workforce management, help develop CM programs consistent with both organizational characteristics and strengths of the nursing profession, help standardize CM practice and education programs, and inform decisions about excluding non-essential activities/knowledge areas.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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