Validity and Reliability of the PHQ-8 Measure of Depressive Symptoms in Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161038
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validity and Reliability of the PHQ-8 Measure of Depressive Symptoms in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Validity and Reliability of the PHQ-8 Measure of Depressive Symptoms in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pressler, Susan, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:J. Kim, School of Nursing, Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN and S. Perkins and C. Ding, Division of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
Problem: Depressive symptoms are common in heart failure (HF) and impair quality of life. Objective: To evaluate construct validity and reliability of a measure of depressive symptoms, the Primary Health Questionnaire-8 (PHQ-8). Sample: 150 HF patients (88 men and 62 women; mean age 61.3 years). Methods: Patients completed the PHQ-8 during face-to-face interviews; also at the interviews the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was assessed and the Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (LHFQ), a health-related quality of life measure, was completed. The PHQ-8 is an 8-item questionnaire with 4-point response scales. The NYHA is a commonly used clinical measure to assess function in HF. The LHFQ is a 21-item questionnaire with 5-point response scales; higher scores indicate poorer quality of life. The LHFQ has a 5-item emotional subscale that was used in this analysis. To evaluate construct validity, principal components confirmatory factor analysis was completed. Construct validity was further evaluated by examining differences among NYHA classes and the correlation between the PHQ-8 and emotional LHFQ subscale. Cronbach's alpha was estimated for internal consistency reliability. Results: The mean PHQ-8 score was 6.77 (SD = 5.52). The NYHA class was I = 23, II =40, III = 71, and IV =16. The mean emotional LHFQ subscale score was 10.3 (SD = 7.34). Factor analysis of the PHQ-8 supported 2 factors (emotions, 4 items; somatic, 3 items). One item loaded on both factors. Factors 1 (emotions) and 2 (somatic) accounted for 46% and 13% of the variance, respectively. Significant differences in PHQ-8 scores in the expected direction were found by NYHA (F = 16.37; p < .0001); patients with NYHA I and II had significantly lower scores that those with NYHA III and IV. The correlation was strong between the PHQ-8 and the emotional LHFQ subscale (r = 0.68, p < .0001). Cronbach's alpha was 0.83. Conclusions: Construct validity of the PHQ-8 was supported by factor analysis. The significant differences in depressive symptoms by NYHA class and the high correlations with emotional health-related quality of life provide further evidence of construct validity of the PHQ-8 in this sample. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidity and Reliability of the PHQ-8 Measure of Depressive Symptoms in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161038-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validity and Reliability of the PHQ-8 Measure of Depressive Symptoms in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pressler, Susan, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sbennet@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Kim, School of Nursing, Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN and S. Perkins and C. Ding, Division of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Depressive symptoms are common in heart failure (HF) and impair quality of life. Objective: To evaluate construct validity and reliability of a measure of depressive symptoms, the Primary Health Questionnaire-8 (PHQ-8). Sample: 150 HF patients (88 men and 62 women; mean age 61.3 years). Methods: Patients completed the PHQ-8 during face-to-face interviews; also at the interviews the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was assessed and the Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (LHFQ), a health-related quality of life measure, was completed. The PHQ-8 is an 8-item questionnaire with 4-point response scales. The NYHA is a commonly used clinical measure to assess function in HF. The LHFQ is a 21-item questionnaire with 5-point response scales; higher scores indicate poorer quality of life. The LHFQ has a 5-item emotional subscale that was used in this analysis. To evaluate construct validity, principal components confirmatory factor analysis was completed. Construct validity was further evaluated by examining differences among NYHA classes and the correlation between the PHQ-8 and emotional LHFQ subscale. Cronbach's alpha was estimated for internal consistency reliability. Results: The mean PHQ-8 score was 6.77 (SD = 5.52). The NYHA class was I = 23, II =40, III = 71, and IV =16. The mean emotional LHFQ subscale score was 10.3 (SD = 7.34). Factor analysis of the PHQ-8 supported 2 factors (emotions, 4 items; somatic, 3 items). One item loaded on both factors. Factors 1 (emotions) and 2 (somatic) accounted for 46% and 13% of the variance, respectively. Significant differences in PHQ-8 scores in the expected direction were found by NYHA (F = 16.37; p &lt; .0001); patients with NYHA I and II had significantly lower scores that those with NYHA III and IV. The correlation was strong between the PHQ-8 and the emotional LHFQ subscale (r = 0.68, p &lt; .0001). Cronbach's alpha was 0.83. Conclusions: Construct validity of the PHQ-8 was supported by factor analysis. The significant differences in depressive symptoms by NYHA class and the high correlations with emotional health-related quality of life provide further evidence of construct validity of the PHQ-8 in this sample. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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