Energy Expenditure and Activity of Preterm Infants During Progression to Nipple Feeding

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161039
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Energy Expenditure and Activity of Preterm Infants During Progression to Nipple Feeding
Abstract:
Energy Expenditure and Activity of Preterm Infants During Progression to Nipple Feeding
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA
The energy that preterm, low birth weight infants expend as they progress from tube to nipple feeding in special care nurseries is an understudied problem from a nursing perspective. A component of energy expenditure that nurses can address is activity, including its expression in quiet and active sleep. Activity may compete with growth for kcalories of energy consumed. Exploration of the relationship of activity and energy expenditure may aid nurses in planning intervention to protect infant use of energy for growth. The purpose of this preliminary, correlational study was to examine the relationship between energy expenditure (EE, kcalories consumed), the extent of the infant's activity and percent of quiet and active sleep, and weight on day of assessment. Near the start of nipple feeding for 13 infants, all appropriate weight for gestational age, EE assessment with bedside indirect calorimetry ranged from 3.1 to 6.6 hours. Activity (mean activity count/2-second epoch through the study, percent of quiet and active sleep estimated with the Sadeh equation) was assessed with an actigraph placed on the upper left arm. On average, infants' birth weight was 1294 grams (SD = 260.66). Infants averaged 29.23 weeks (SD = 2.28) gestational age at birth, and at assessment were 34.23 weeks (SD = 1.00) post-menstrual age and weighed 1921 grams (SD = 238.22. All 7 infants with a diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome had recovered without need for supplemental oxygen. EE computed with the Weir formula was 28.91 kcalories (SD = 6.93). Infants averaged 0.85 activity counts/2-second epoch(SD = 0.46), 39.83 % time (SD = 15.64) in active sleep, and 49.06% in quiet sleep (SD =17.14). EE had a negative but not significant correlation with quiet sleep (r =-0.30, p =.32) and a small nonsignificant correlation (r = 0.17) with active sleep . The correlation of EE with activity count was nonsignificant but positive (r = 31, p =.30). EE was highly positively correlated with weight on assessment day (r = 0.72, p = .005). Further study with a larger sample will include examination of the relationship of EE and activity measures in the multivariate context of post-menstrual age, caloric intake, weight, and rate of growth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnergy Expenditure and Activity of Preterm Infants During Progression to Nipple Feedingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161039-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Energy Expenditure and Activity of Preterm Infants During Progression to Nipple Feeding</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The energy that preterm, low birth weight infants expend as they progress from tube to nipple feeding in special care nurseries is an understudied problem from a nursing perspective. A component of energy expenditure that nurses can address is activity, including its expression in quiet and active sleep. Activity may compete with growth for kcalories of energy consumed. Exploration of the relationship of activity and energy expenditure may aid nurses in planning intervention to protect infant use of energy for growth. The purpose of this preliminary, correlational study was to examine the relationship between energy expenditure (EE, kcalories consumed), the extent of the infant's activity and percent of quiet and active sleep, and weight on day of assessment. Near the start of nipple feeding for 13 infants, all appropriate weight for gestational age, EE assessment with bedside indirect calorimetry ranged from 3.1 to 6.6 hours. Activity (mean activity count/2-second epoch through the study, percent of quiet and active sleep estimated with the Sadeh equation) was assessed with an actigraph placed on the upper left arm. On average, infants' birth weight was 1294 grams (SD = 260.66). Infants averaged 29.23 weeks (SD = 2.28) gestational age at birth, and at assessment were 34.23 weeks (SD = 1.00) post-menstrual age and weighed 1921 grams (SD = 238.22. All 7 infants with a diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome had recovered without need for supplemental oxygen. EE computed with the Weir formula was 28.91 kcalories (SD = 6.93). Infants averaged 0.85 activity counts/2-second epoch(SD = 0.46), 39.83 % time (SD = 15.64) in active sleep, and 49.06% in quiet sleep (SD =17.14). EE had a negative but not significant correlation with quiet sleep (r =-0.30, p =.32) and a small nonsignificant correlation (r = 0.17) with active sleep . The correlation of EE with activity count was nonsignificant but positive (r = 31, p =.30). EE was highly positively correlated with weight on assessment day (r = 0.72, p = .005). Further study with a larger sample will include examination of the relationship of EE and activity measures in the multivariate context of post-menstrual age, caloric intake, weight, and rate of growth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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