2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161040
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Protective Leaving
Abstract:
Protective Leaving
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Reid, Alva, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Department of Veteran Affairs
Contact Address:, Cincinnati, OH, 45229, USA
Despite the deleterious consequences of intimate partner violence, women commonly leave and return to such relationships. Yet, evidence exists that this phenomenon may be poorly understood, which presents a major hindrance to the ability of health care providers to deliver compassionate, holistic care. Grounded theory methodology (Strauss & Corbin, 1990, 1998) was utilized to describe the experiences of 18 primarily homeless, African-American women whose relationships included substance use and who had left and returned to an intimate partner abusive relationship multiple times. Data were collected by audio taped, semi-structured interview. Research findings indicate that leaving and returning was a crisis management strategy, which women described as protective leaving. A key factor associated with protective leaving was extreme violence, which often occurred within the context of the male partner's drug and alcohol use. Within this context, women perceived that abusive episodes were more severe, frequent and unpredictable, a factor in their ability to assign responsibility to the partner. Researchers have documented assigning responsibility as a major step in relationship termination. Due to economic deprivation, these women were entrapped. Therefore, protective leaving may indicate readiness to terminate an abusive relationship. Because of economic deprivation, women's choices for survival external to the relationship were often relegated to informal networks, contributing to the potential for further violence. This danger continuity was a powerful motivator for returning to the relationship. Services that are designed to protect abused women offer minimal protection to impoverished women. This research offers implications for treatment of an overlooked population of abused women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProtective Leavingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161040-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Protective Leaving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reid, Alva, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Department of Veteran Affairs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Cincinnati, OH, 45229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amhreid@cinci.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the deleterious consequences of intimate partner violence, women commonly leave and return to such relationships. Yet, evidence exists that this phenomenon may be poorly understood, which presents a major hindrance to the ability of health care providers to deliver compassionate, holistic care. Grounded theory methodology (Strauss &amp; Corbin, 1990, 1998) was utilized to describe the experiences of 18 primarily homeless, African-American women whose relationships included substance use and who had left and returned to an intimate partner abusive relationship multiple times. Data were collected by audio taped, semi-structured interview. Research findings indicate that leaving and returning was a crisis management strategy, which women described as protective leaving. A key factor associated with protective leaving was extreme violence, which often occurred within the context of the male partner's drug and alcohol use. Within this context, women perceived that abusive episodes were more severe, frequent and unpredictable, a factor in their ability to assign responsibility to the partner. Researchers have documented assigning responsibility as a major step in relationship termination. Due to economic deprivation, these women were entrapped. Therefore, protective leaving may indicate readiness to terminate an abusive relationship. Because of economic deprivation, women's choices for survival external to the relationship were often relegated to informal networks, contributing to the potential for further violence. This danger continuity was a powerful motivator for returning to the relationship. Services that are designed to protect abused women offer minimal protection to impoverished women. This research offers implications for treatment of an overlooked population of abused women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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