2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161041
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Modeling Psychological Functioning in Refugees
Abstract:
Modeling Psychological Functioning in Refugees
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Robertson, Cheryl, PhD, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:SON - 5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55406, USA
Co-Authors:K. Savikk, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Purpose: Refugee health research consistently identifies impairments of psychological functioning in their post-resettlement lives. But there is little existing theory about refugee mental health to guide the development of supportive interventions specific to the needs of trauma survivors. The overall aim of this study is to develop and refine a hypothesized multifactorial model that predicts psychological health for refugee trauma survivors. The model builds on existing rudimentary theory, contributes to understanding the complex relationships among factors that influence the health of high risk refugees, and will inform intervention development. Methods: Study design: Secondary analysis of cross sectional data. Setting: Twin Cities region in Minnesota. Participants: 449 participants from a large epidemiological study (N=1129) of the prevalence of trauma and associated factors in the Somali and Oromo communities. Primary outcome measures: Composite trauma score (self-report survey); composite psychological functioning score (Post-traumatic Checklist-civilian version, Symptom Checklist-somatic scale, Duke Social Support Scale, Sheehan Disability Index). Latent class analysis was used to identify hypothesized subgroups of trauma survivors. Aneshensel's (2002) theory-based approach to cross-sectional data analysis was used to examine the effects of a range of antecedents and to identify variables that moderated or mediated the focal relationship. Preliminary results: Six subgroups of trauma survivors were identified. The most powerful antecedent was female gender. Exposure to torture, length of time in prison, and years in transit did not moderate current psychological functioning. Among potential mediators, high levels of family responsibilities, increased religiosity, and perceived racism were associated with lower psychological functioning. Increased social support was associated with higher levels of psychological functioning. Discussion: Increased social support appears to contribute to healthier psychological functioning for moderate to severely traumatized refugees. This has implications for targeting community-based psycho-social interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleModeling Psychological Functioning in Refugeesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161041-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Modeling Psychological Functioning in Refugees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robertson, Cheryl, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON - 5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55406, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rober007@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Savikk, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Refugee health research consistently identifies impairments of psychological functioning in their post-resettlement lives. But there is little existing theory about refugee mental health to guide the development of supportive interventions specific to the needs of trauma survivors. The overall aim of this study is to develop and refine a hypothesized multifactorial model that predicts psychological health for refugee trauma survivors. The model builds on existing rudimentary theory, contributes to understanding the complex relationships among factors that influence the health of high risk refugees, and will inform intervention development. Methods: Study design: Secondary analysis of cross sectional data. Setting: Twin Cities region in Minnesota. Participants: 449 participants from a large epidemiological study (N=1129) of the prevalence of trauma and associated factors in the Somali and Oromo communities. Primary outcome measures: Composite trauma score (self-report survey); composite psychological functioning score (Post-traumatic Checklist-civilian version, Symptom Checklist-somatic scale, Duke Social Support Scale, Sheehan Disability Index). Latent class analysis was used to identify hypothesized subgroups of trauma survivors. Aneshensel's (2002) theory-based approach to cross-sectional data analysis was used to examine the effects of a range of antecedents and to identify variables that moderated or mediated the focal relationship. Preliminary results: Six subgroups of trauma survivors were identified. The most powerful antecedent was female gender. Exposure to torture, length of time in prison, and years in transit did not moderate current psychological functioning. Among potential mediators, high levels of family responsibilities, increased religiosity, and perceived racism were associated with lower psychological functioning. Increased social support was associated with higher levels of psychological functioning. Discussion: Increased social support appears to contribute to healthier psychological functioning for moderate to severely traumatized refugees. This has implications for targeting community-based psycho-social interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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