2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161043
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model for Nursing Student Achievement
Abstract:
A Model for Nursing Student Achievement
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Savage, Deb, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH College of Health Sciences
Contact Address:, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA
Co-Authors:J.E. Smith, Research Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE
It has been documented that good nutrition and physical fitness improve the academic performance of grade school children, but little is known about the influence of these factors on the achievement of college age individuals. This study sought to identify a model demonstrating the interrelationship among healthy lifestyle choices and academic achievement in nursing students. Data for the study were taken from the Wellsource« Personal Wellness ProfileÖ (PWP) instrument completed by 368 students entering a nursing education program from August 2000 through October 2005. The PWP was developed and validated by national health care associations as a tool for predicting health risks. Reliability in this population was established with a Cronbach's alpha of .84. Student achievement was measured with student grade point averages. Path analysis was used to validate a hypothesized model of student achievement. The model predicted that nutrition, social well-being, stress/coping and physical fitness would directly influence student achievement. The hypothesized model also predicted that social well-being and stress/coping would have indirect influences on achievement through influences on nutrition and physical activity. Indirect influences were also hypothesized to exist between social well-being and stress/coping, stress/coping and nutrition and nutrition and physical activity. The resulting causal model was less complex than the hypothesized model. Nutrition (.268), stress/coping (.219) and physical activity (.117) had direct, statistically significant (p<.05) influences on academic achievement. Nutrition (.12) had a statistically significant (p<.05) influence on social well-being and social well-being (.725) was found to have a statistically significant (p<.05) influence on stress/coping. This study demonstrated that healthy lifestyle choices influenced the lives and achievement of nursing students. As schools of nursing strive to provide their students with support for program success, they may need to consider some basic lifestyle factors that have not previously been recognized as influencing academic success. Faculty and administrators of nursing programs and individuals who manage or teach practicing nurses may benefit from the results of this study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model for Nursing Student Achievementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161043-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model for Nursing Student Achievement</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Savage, Deb, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsavage@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.E. Smith, Research Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It has been documented that good nutrition and physical fitness improve the academic performance of grade school children, but little is known about the influence of these factors on the achievement of college age individuals. This study sought to identify a model demonstrating the interrelationship among healthy lifestyle choices and academic achievement in nursing students. Data for the study were taken from the Wellsource&laquo; Personal Wellness Profile&Ouml; (PWP) instrument completed by 368 students entering a nursing education program from August 2000 through October 2005. The PWP was developed and validated by national health care associations as a tool for predicting health risks. Reliability in this population was established with a Cronbach's alpha of .84. Student achievement was measured with student grade point averages. Path analysis was used to validate a hypothesized model of student achievement. The model predicted that nutrition, social well-being, stress/coping and physical fitness would directly influence student achievement. The hypothesized model also predicted that social well-being and stress/coping would have indirect influences on achievement through influences on nutrition and physical activity. Indirect influences were also hypothesized to exist between social well-being and stress/coping, stress/coping and nutrition and nutrition and physical activity. The resulting causal model was less complex than the hypothesized model. Nutrition (.268), stress/coping (.219) and physical activity (.117) had direct, statistically significant (p&lt;.05) influences on academic achievement. Nutrition (.12) had a statistically significant (p&lt;.05) influence on social well-being and social well-being (.725) was found to have a statistically significant (p&lt;.05) influence on stress/coping. This study demonstrated that healthy lifestyle choices influenced the lives and achievement of nursing students. As schools of nursing strive to provide their students with support for program success, they may need to consider some basic lifestyle factors that have not previously been recognized as influencing academic success. Faculty and administrators of nursing programs and individuals who manage or teach practicing nurses may benefit from the results of this study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:14:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:14:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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