Evidence-Based Clinical Practice: The Promethazine (Phenergan) Administration Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161045
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Clinical Practice: The Promethazine (Phenergan) Administration Project
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Clinical Practice: The Promethazine (Phenergan) Administration Project
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Seemann, Sara, MSN, RN, ONC
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH Medical Center
Contact Address:Emergency Department, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA
Co-Authors:J.E. Smith, Research Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE
Promethazine (Phenergan) is a drug frequently given to control nausea and vomiting. There have been reports in the literature of improper administration of this drug and complications resulting in 1) irreparable damage to the patient including amputation and 2) malpractice settlements for millions of dollars with nurses identified as secondary defendants. Promethazine was administered to 8,671 patients at a Midwestern medical center in 2005. Concern about the potentially disastrous consequences of improper administration of this drug prompted the initiation of an evidence-based practice study using the Evidence-Based Practice Model developed by the Center for Advanced Nursing Practice (the Model) (c) as the organizing framework. Phase one of the study (the Evidence-Triggered Phase) was completed with the identification of the practice question: "Could changes in clinical practice for the administration of IV Promethazine decrease the incidence of superficial phlebitis experienced by patients?" The second phase of the study (the Evidence-Supported Phase of the Model) consisted of a review and summarization of the literature related to the practice question. This review identified that IV administration of Promethazine was associated with a significant risk for phlebitis. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for reducing complications were also reviewed. Within the third phase of the study (the Evidence-Observed Phase) practice changes were designed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team. The involvement of key clinicians and stakeholders was critical for successful implementation of practice changes. The final phase of the study (the Evidence-Based Phase) involved evaluation of the outcomes of practice changes. This study effectively: (1) increased clinician confidence with administering IV Promethazine, (2) increased awareness of risks associated with IV Promethazine and action steps to reduce risks, (3) assured clinician compliance with practice guidelines, and (4) eliminated instances of superficial phlebitis. This presentation provides practicing nurses, nursing administrators and nurse educators with valuable information about how to effectively work through the phases essential to the success of an evidence-based practice project.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Clinical Practice: The Promethazine (Phenergan) Administration Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161045-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Clinical Practice: The Promethazine (Phenergan) Administration Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seemann, Sara, MSN, RN, ONC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sseemann@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.E. Smith, Research Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Promethazine (Phenergan) is a drug frequently given to control nausea and vomiting. There have been reports in the literature of improper administration of this drug and complications resulting in 1) irreparable damage to the patient including amputation and 2) malpractice settlements for millions of dollars with nurses identified as secondary defendants. Promethazine was administered to 8,671 patients at a Midwestern medical center in 2005. Concern about the potentially disastrous consequences of improper administration of this drug prompted the initiation of an evidence-based practice study using the Evidence-Based Practice Model developed by the Center for Advanced Nursing Practice (the Model) (c) as the organizing framework. Phase one of the study (the Evidence-Triggered Phase) was completed with the identification of the practice question: &quot;Could changes in clinical practice for the administration of IV Promethazine decrease the incidence of superficial phlebitis experienced by patients?&quot; The second phase of the study (the Evidence-Supported Phase of the Model) consisted of a review and summarization of the literature related to the practice question. This review identified that IV administration of Promethazine was associated with a significant risk for phlebitis. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for reducing complications were also reviewed. Within the third phase of the study (the Evidence-Observed Phase) practice changes were designed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team. The involvement of key clinicians and stakeholders was critical for successful implementation of practice changes. The final phase of the study (the Evidence-Based Phase) involved evaluation of the outcomes of practice changes. This study effectively: (1) increased clinician confidence with administering IV Promethazine, (2) increased awareness of risks associated with IV Promethazine and action steps to reduce risks, (3) assured clinician compliance with practice guidelines, and (4) eliminated instances of superficial phlebitis. This presentation provides practicing nurses, nursing administrators and nurse educators with valuable information about how to effectively work through the phases essential to the success of an evidence-based practice project.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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