The Unique Contributions of Nursing Surveillance and Fluid Management on Hospital Cost

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161047
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Unique Contributions of Nursing Surveillance and Fluid Management on Hospital Cost
Abstract:
The Unique Contributions of Nursing Surveillance and Fluid Management on Hospital Cost
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Shever, Leah, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa College of Nursing
Contact Address:, Coralville, IA, 52241, USA
Co-Authors:M.G. Titler and P. Kerr, T. Kim, University of Iowa College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA; D.M. Picone, Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the unique contributions of 2 nursing interventions, Surveillance and Fluid Management, on hospital cost for older adults in an acute care setting. Subjects (N=10,187 hospitalizations): Inclusion criteria: 1) > 60 years old; 2) admitted to a Midwest tertiary hospital; 3) at risk for falls. Mean age was 74, most were Caucasian, retired, and admitted from home. Methods: Data for this study are from nine electronic data repositories at one Midwestern academic center, including nursing care that was captured electronically in the medical record. Propensity scoring and regression were used as methods to analyze the data. Each nursing intervention was dichotomized to generate the propensity score: high (> 12 times/day) and low (<12 times/day) Surveillance use and high (> 2 times/day) and low (<2 times/day) Fluid Management use. The propensity score, the nursing intervention, and other variables thought to influence hospital cost were then entered into a regression analysis to determine their effects on hospital cost. Findings: The total median cost was $9,274 per hospitalization for this sample. After controlling for the variables that were used to generate the propensity score (the covariates), median cost was significantly (p = 0.0503) different between high and low use of Surveillance. High Surveillance use increased the median hospital cost by $191 per hospitalization compared to low Surveillance use. After controlling for covariates, median cost was significantly (p< 0.0001) different between high and low use of Fluid Management, which indicates that delivering Fluid Management at least two times a day saves $763 on the median hospital cost. Other significant patient comorbities, nurse staffing variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing interventions contributing to cost will be presented. Conclusion: This study shows the unique contributions of Surveillance and Fluid Management upon hospital cost. This study also shows that propensity scoring can be used to understand the unique contributions of specific nursing interventions on patient outcomes. This research was supported by a grant from NIH (PI: Titler, NINR R01 NR05331).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Unique Contributions of Nursing Surveillance and Fluid Management on Hospital Costen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161047-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Unique Contributions of Nursing Surveillance and Fluid Management on Hospital Cost</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shever, Leah, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Coralville, IA, 52241, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leah-shever@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.G. Titler and P. Kerr, T. Kim, University of Iowa College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA; D.M. Picone, Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the unique contributions of 2 nursing interventions, Surveillance and Fluid Management, on hospital cost for older adults in an acute care setting. Subjects (N=10,187 hospitalizations): Inclusion criteria: 1) &gt; 60 years old; 2) admitted to a Midwest tertiary hospital; 3) at risk for falls. Mean age was 74, most were Caucasian, retired, and admitted from home. Methods: Data for this study are from nine electronic data repositories at one Midwestern academic center, including nursing care that was captured electronically in the medical record. Propensity scoring and regression were used as methods to analyze the data. Each nursing intervention was dichotomized to generate the propensity score: high (&gt; 12 times/day) and low (&lt;12 times/day) Surveillance use and high (&gt; 2 times/day) and low (&lt;2 times/day) Fluid Management use. The propensity score, the nursing intervention, and other variables thought to influence hospital cost were then entered into a regression analysis to determine their effects on hospital cost. Findings: The total median cost was $9,274 per hospitalization for this sample. After controlling for the variables that were used to generate the propensity score (the covariates), median cost was significantly (p = 0.0503) different between high and low use of Surveillance. High Surveillance use increased the median hospital cost by $191 per hospitalization compared to low Surveillance use. After controlling for covariates, median cost was significantly (p&lt; 0.0001) different between high and low use of Fluid Management, which indicates that delivering Fluid Management at least two times a day saves $763 on the median hospital cost. Other significant patient comorbities, nurse staffing variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing interventions contributing to cost will be presented. Conclusion: This study shows the unique contributions of Surveillance and Fluid Management upon hospital cost. This study also shows that propensity scoring can be used to understand the unique contributions of specific nursing interventions on patient outcomes. This research was supported by a grant from NIH (PI: Titler, NINR R01 NR05331).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.