2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161048
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Coping in Nurse Managers: A Qualitative Description
Abstract:
Stress and Coping in Nurse Managers: A Qualitative Description
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Shirey, Maria, MS, MBA, RN, CNAA, BC, FACHE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Contact Address:Nursing- Graduate Program, Evansville, IN, 47725, USA
Problem/Purpose: Little research is available to address stress and coping in U.S. nurse manager subjects. The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain a first hand qualitative description of nurse manager stress and coping experiences. Theoretical Framework: The transaction-based view of stress informed the investigator's conceptual outlook of stress and coping. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to answer the research questions: What situations contribute to stress in today's nurse managers? What decision-making processes do nurse managers utilize to address stressful situations in their roles? A convenience sample of five experienced nurse managers employed at a large U.S. Midwestern acute care hospital participated in the study. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and a structured face-to-face interview consisting of five open-ended questions incorporating components of the Critical Decision Method (CDM). The CDM is a retrospective interview strategy with cognitive probes that focuses on non-routine, difficult situations to generate a cognitive task analysis. Results: The unpredictable and invisible nature of nurse manager work combined with interpersonal conflicts in the workplace contributed to perceptions of stress in the role. Unpredictability had to do with complexity and perceived lack of control over the role and the work environment. Interpersonal conflicts related primarily to differences in values and leadership styles as well as perceptions of limited or absent social support systems at work. The decision-making processes nurse managers used to address stressful situations in their role involved attention to environmental cues, tapping into personal experiences or attributes, and stacking or compartmentalizing competing priorities. Conclusions: Performance expectations for nurse managers practicing in today's acute care settings may be unrealistic. These expectations are increasing nurse manager perceptions of stress, making coping more difficult, and potentially harming nurse manager and work environment well-being. Findings from this study have significant implications for nursing research, practice, and policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Coping in Nurse Managers: A Qualitative Descriptionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161048-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Coping in Nurse Managers: A Qualitative Description</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shirey, Maria, MS, MBA, RN, CNAA, BC, FACHE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing- Graduate Program, Evansville, IN, 47725, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrs@mail2maria.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Purpose: Little research is available to address stress and coping in U.S. nurse manager subjects. The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain a first hand qualitative description of nurse manager stress and coping experiences. Theoretical Framework: The transaction-based view of stress informed the investigator's conceptual outlook of stress and coping. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to answer the research questions: What situations contribute to stress in today's nurse managers? What decision-making processes do nurse managers utilize to address stressful situations in their roles? A convenience sample of five experienced nurse managers employed at a large U.S. Midwestern acute care hospital participated in the study. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and a structured face-to-face interview consisting of five open-ended questions incorporating components of the Critical Decision Method (CDM). The CDM is a retrospective interview strategy with cognitive probes that focuses on non-routine, difficult situations to generate a cognitive task analysis. Results: The unpredictable and invisible nature of nurse manager work combined with interpersonal conflicts in the workplace contributed to perceptions of stress in the role. Unpredictability had to do with complexity and perceived lack of control over the role and the work environment. Interpersonal conflicts related primarily to differences in values and leadership styles as well as perceptions of limited or absent social support systems at work. The decision-making processes nurse managers used to address stressful situations in their role involved attention to environmental cues, tapping into personal experiences or attributes, and stacking or compartmentalizing competing priorities. Conclusions: Performance expectations for nurse managers practicing in today's acute care settings may be unrealistic. These expectations are increasing nurse manager perceptions of stress, making coping more difficult, and potentially harming nurse manager and work environment well-being. Findings from this study have significant implications for nursing research, practice, and policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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