The Impact of Hyperglycemia on Length of Stay (LOS) and Hospital Charges for Patients with Mental Health Diagnoses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161049
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Hyperglycemia on Length of Stay (LOS) and Hospital Charges for Patients with Mental Health Diagnoses
Abstract:
The Impact of Hyperglycemia on Length of Stay (LOS) and Hospital Charges for Patients with Mental Health Diagnoses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Smith, June, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH College of Health Sciences
Contact Address:, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA
Co-Authors:P. Adams, Mental Health Service, BryanLGH Medical Center, Lincoln, NE
Hyperglycemia has been implicated in poor outcomes for patients admitted to intensive care units, undergoing cardiac procedures, suffering strokes or trauma. Very little, however, is currently known about the influence of hyperglycemia on the hospitalization outcomes of patients with mental health diagnoses. The purposes of this study were to: (1) Determine the proportion of patients, admitted to a regional acute care facility's inpatient psychiatry service with psychiatric diagnoses, who were hyperglycemic during their hospitals stays. (2) Explore the impact of hyperglycemia on those patients' hospitalization outcomes. Information for all patients admitted to psychiatry units from June 1, 2005 through May 31, 2006 was downloaded from administrative databases. The resulting dataset included records for 2,967 patients. Of those patients, 707 either did not have a blood glucose drawn (n = 627) or had only one high blood glucose reading on their day of admission (n = 80). Data collected on the remaining 2,260 patients included age, blood glucose values, medications given for blood glucose control, primary diagnosis, secondary diagnosis of diabetes, length of stay (LOS) and hospital charges. Patients were designated as "hyperglycemic" if one or more blood glucose values were greater than 140 mg/dl. There were 229 or 10% of the patients who were "hyperglycemic." There were 219 patients who were identified as diabetic and 145 of those were "hyperglycemic." LOS (p<.0001) and charges (p<.0001) were significantly higher for "hyperglycemic" patients than for normo-glycemic patients. LOS and charges were also compared for patients with a diagnosis of depression (n = 224) and the 14 "hyperglycemic" patients had significantly higher average LOS (p=.001) and charges (p=.003) than the 210 normo-glycemic patients with depression. For patients with a diagnosis of psychosis (n = 1,526), only charges were significantly higher (p<.0001) for the 154 "hyperglycemic" patients. All comparative analyses were controlled for the influence of patient age. The results of this study provide an impetus for improving the blood glucose control of patients with mental health diagnoses and a motivation for further research into the effects of blood glucose on mental health disorders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Hyperglycemia on Length of Stay (LOS) and Hospital Charges for Patients with Mental Health Diagnosesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161049-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Hyperglycemia on Length of Stay (LOS) and Hospital Charges for Patients with Mental Health Diagnoses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, June, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">june.smith@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Adams, Mental Health Service, BryanLGH Medical Center, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hyperglycemia has been implicated in poor outcomes for patients admitted to intensive care units, undergoing cardiac procedures, suffering strokes or trauma. Very little, however, is currently known about the influence of hyperglycemia on the hospitalization outcomes of patients with mental health diagnoses. The purposes of this study were to: (1) Determine the proportion of patients, admitted to a regional acute care facility's inpatient psychiatry service with psychiatric diagnoses, who were hyperglycemic during their hospitals stays. (2) Explore the impact of hyperglycemia on those patients' hospitalization outcomes. Information for all patients admitted to psychiatry units from June 1, 2005 through May 31, 2006 was downloaded from administrative databases. The resulting dataset included records for 2,967 patients. Of those patients, 707 either did not have a blood glucose drawn (n = 627) or had only one high blood glucose reading on their day of admission (n = 80). Data collected on the remaining 2,260 patients included age, blood glucose values, medications given for blood glucose control, primary diagnosis, secondary diagnosis of diabetes, length of stay (LOS) and hospital charges. Patients were designated as &quot;hyperglycemic&quot; if one or more blood glucose values were greater than 140 mg/dl. There were 229 or 10% of the patients who were &quot;hyperglycemic.&quot; There were 219 patients who were identified as diabetic and 145 of those were &quot;hyperglycemic.&quot; LOS (p&lt;.0001) and charges (p&lt;.0001) were significantly higher for &quot;hyperglycemic&quot; patients than for normo-glycemic patients. LOS and charges were also compared for patients with a diagnosis of depression (n = 224) and the 14 &quot;hyperglycemic&quot; patients had significantly higher average LOS (p=.001) and charges (p=.003) than the 210 normo-glycemic patients with depression. For patients with a diagnosis of psychosis (n = 1,526), only charges were significantly higher (p&lt;.0001) for the 154 &quot;hyperglycemic&quot; patients. All comparative analyses were controlled for the influence of patient age. The results of this study provide an impetus for improving the blood glucose control of patients with mental health diagnoses and a motivation for further research into the effects of blood glucose on mental health disorders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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